AN AGRA CARPET
AN AGRA CARPET
AN AGRA CARPET
2 More
AN AGRA CARPET
5 More
Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE ITALIAN ESTATE
AN AGRA CARPET

NORTH INDIA, LATE 19TH CENTURY

Details
AN AGRA CARPET
NORTH INDIA, LATE 19TH CENTURY
Of Mughal 'Shrub' design, full pile, light overall surface dirt, localised restoration, bound on all four sides, overall fair condition
12ft.6in. x 8ft.8in. (382cm. x 265cm.)
Special notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.
This lot has been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

Brought to you by

Barney Bartlett
Barney Bartlett Cataloguer

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay


Under the Mughal maharajas in 17th century India, and most particularly during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan (1628-1658), heightened attention was placed on the naturalistic rendering of the surrounding flora, as seen in the lot 178 in the present sale. Distinctive designs comprising rows or formal arrangements of naturalistic flowers were woven upon rich ruby-red grounds, accurately displaying recognisable specimens of lily, poppy, carnation, tulip, violet and narcissus. Such designs remained popular with Indian weavers, both in carpets and textiles, for the next few hundred years although greater artistic liberties were taken over time, often making identification problematic.
The decorative design of the present carpet recalls these early Mughal patterns but is now set upon an ivory field and the flowers have been miniaturised and are perhaps less recognisable. Many such Mughal-inspired revival carpets in the 19th century were woven in the jails of Agra and Lahore, which employed similar repetitive floral designs albeit with slight variations in their colour palette (Ian Bennett, Jail Birds, Exhibition Catalogue, London, 1987, pl.26). Coveted by decorators for their palette and elegant design, a relatively small number have appeared at auction over the years, with the most recent selling in these Rooms, 25 June 2020, lot 187.

More from Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds including Oriental Rugs and Carpets

View All
View All