LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY, R.A. (1887-1976)
LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY, R.A. (1887-1976)
LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY, R.A. (1887-1976)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN
LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY, R.A. (1887-1976)

Children in the Street

Details
LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY, R.A. (1887-1976)
Children in the Street
signed and dated 'LS. LOWRY 1966.' (lower right)
oil on board
7 1⁄4 x 7 3⁄4 in. (18.4 x 19.7 cm.)
Painted in 1966.
Provenance
Anonymous sale; Christie's London, 9 March 1984, lot 208, where purchased by the present owner.
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Lot Essay

Throughout the 1960s, Lowry's work changed emphasis, and by now his figure groups are the subject of his paintings. The urban landscape becomes just a frame around the people who stand confidently in the centre of his canvases, with the side or edge of a building used to position them, and the single line of a pavement to ground them. These people now represent the urban scene, and the mood is effortlessly conveyed to the viewer by the flick of a brush, or in the position of their conversational groups. Lowry wrote 'I see lots of people everywhere, myself, one lot going one way and the other lot going the opposite way as a rule' (see S. Rohde, L.S. Lowry, A Biography, Salford, 1999, p. 318).

Lowry often favoured a particular type of figure, and some regular characters appear in the present work. The girl dressed in the red jumper, the youth with the large mop of hair, and the three girls who hold hands in a row; they have become a kind of shorthand for the people that Lowry saw around him, and they capture the attention of the viewer and give a sense of familiarity. However, the startling colours or physical attributes never fail to capture the imagination, and the inclusion of an outsized dog provides a comic touch, as it appears to hold the full attention of its owner. In this group of conversational figures, who appear before us in a kind of theatrical chorus line, Lowry presents a focused vignette of city life in all its daily bustle.

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