PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR (1841-1919)
PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR (1841-1919)
PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR (1841-1919)
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PROPERTY OF THE FAMILY OF PETER GOODMAN
PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR (1841-1919)

Jeune femme assise jouant de la guitare

Details
PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR (1841-1919)
Jeune femme assise jouant de la guitare
signed 'Renoir.' (lower left)
oil on canvas
14 5⁄8 x 12 1⁄4 in. (37.2 x 31.1 cm.)
Painted in 1898-1900
Provenance
Galerie Durand-Ruel et Cie., Paris (acquired from the artist, July 1919).
Durand-Ruel Galleries, New York (acquired from the above, 1921).
Justin K. Thannhauser, New York (acquired from the above, January 1944).
Acquired from the above by the family of the late owners, February 1944.
Exhibited
Hagerstown, Maryland, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Fifth Anniversary Exhibition, October-November 1936, p. 6, no. 16 (dated 1909).
Post lot text
This work will be included in the forthcoming Pierre-Auguste Renoir digital catalogue raisonné, currently being prepared under the sponsorship of the Wildenstein Plattner Institute, Inc.

This work will be included in the second supplement to the Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles de Renoir being prepared by Guy-Patrice and Floriane Dauberville.

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Lot Essay

Jeune femme assise jouant de la guitare belongs to a group of works that Renoir painted of women and men playing the guitar. Renoir's appreciation for "La Belle Otéro," a dancer at the Folies-Bergère who was celebrated at the time as the embodiment of Spanish seduction, is thought to have inspired these works. Although the model in the present work lacks the overtly Spanish costume seen in Jeune espagnole avec une guitare, 1898 (National Gallery, Washington, D.C.), her outfit still gives the impression of a costume piece. This dramatic clothing contrasts the modest, informal modern dresses that the painter used in his numerous scenes from this period of young bourgeois women talking, reading and sitting together.
The theme of a figure playing a musical instrument also manifests Renoir's interest in the tradition of French painting, with precedents including Le Guitariste, 1755-1760 (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nantes) by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, and Le chanteur espagnol, 1860 (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) by Edouard Manet. Camille Corot's figure subjects were particularly influential on Renoir at this time, and the elder painter's numerous images of women with instruments share the sense of reverie in the present work.

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