DAVID JORIS (BRUGES [?] CIRCA 1501-1556 BÂLE)
DAVID JORIS (BRUGES [?] CIRCA 1501-1556 BÂLE)

David combattant les vices

Details
DAVID JORIS (BRUGES [?] CIRCA 1501-1556 BÂLE)
David combattant les vices
monogrammé ‘.di.’ et avec inscription ‘Johann Baldung Gruen/ geb: 1473 [?] + 1545/ Original Federzeichnung.’ (en bas à droite)
plume et encre brune et rouge, traits d’encadrement à la plume et encre brune, filigrane écu couronné avec fleur de lys et bandes diagonales, filigrane armoiries de Troyes avec lettres ‘IP’ (repéré sur du papier utilisé à Arnhem, daté 1537-1539)


42 x 28,7 cm (16 1⁄2 x 11 1⁄4 in.)
Post lot text
DAVID JORIS, DAVID FIGHTING THE VICES, PEN AND BROWN AND RED INK, FRAMING LINES WITH PEN AND BROWN INK, WATERMARK COAT OF ARMS OF TROYES WITH LETTERS 'IP'
Considered by some ‘one on the most lurid figures in the whole history of art’ (F. Thöne, Old Master Drawings, XIII, no. 51, October 1938, p. 43), David Joris is best remembered as a religious leader, who came to prominence as an Anabaptist leader in the Netherlands in the second half of the 1530s (G.K. Waite, David Joris and Dutch Anabaptism, 1524-1543, Waterloo, Ontario, 1990). He was baptised in Delft in 1534 by Obbe Philips, one of the early leaders of the Anabaptist movement, of which Joris himself because a major figure soon after. His views brought him, his family and his followers harsh prosecution, and forced him to lead an itinerary life – in Antwerp and East Frisia, among others, until he decided to move to Basle in 1544. There, he pretended to be a Netherlandish nobleman of wealth, taking the name Jan van Brugge, or ‘John of Bruges’. His lavish life was financed by his followers in Basle and the Netherlands, and he continued his activity as a prolific author, writing in Dutch and publishing anonymously. Only after his death his true identity appears to have been revealed to the population of Basle, he was declared a heretic, and his corpse was exhumed and burned.
Joris, the son of a member of a chamber of rhetoric, was also artistically inclined, and received a training as a glass painter. A good number of designs for stained glass windows, varying greatly in style, have been attributed to him, but at best, their attribution is based on later inscriptions (see, among others, H. Koegler, ‘Einiges über David Joris als Künstler’, Oeffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Jahresberichte, new series, XXV-XXVII, 1928-1930, pp. 157-201; K.G. Boon, ‘De glasschilder David Joris, een exponent van het doperse geloof. Zijn kunst en invloed op Dirck Crabeth’, Academia analecta. Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten van België, IL, 1988, no. 1, pp.117-137; and A. Mensger, Lichtgestalten. Zeichnungen und Glasgemälde von Holbein bis Ringler, exhib. cat., Basle, Kunstmuseum Basel, 2020, nos. 49-57). The only previously known works of truly secure attribution by Joris are two full-page woodcut designs, illustrating Joris’s treatise from 1542, Twonder boeck (Koegler, op. cit., pp. 173-177, ill.). To these can now be added the present drawing, which at lower right bears the same monogram found on the woodcuts, and which is closely related in style. This is in particular true of the allegorical woodcut depicting a nude man, with its comparable facial features, feet, etc.. The general manner is akin to that of Jan Swart van Groningen (before 1500-after 1560), whose influence Joris may have underwent, either directly or indirectly (T.B. Husband, The Luminous Image. Painted Glass Roundels in the Lowlands, 1480-1560, exhib. cat., New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1995, pp. 166-167, nos. 91-96, ill.). Stylistic connections with the work of Dirck Crabeth (1510/1520?-1574) can also be noted (ibid., pp. 198-199, nos. 117-128, ill.), but his activity appears to have been later than that of Joris.
As with the two woodcuts, the meaning of the newly discovered drawing is far from easy to explain. Its date, inscribed on the arch at upper left, situates it in the year in which, in the month of December, Joris started to experience visions (Waite, op. cit., pp. 68-72). In these, he saw himself as the ‘third David’ (the first David being the Israelite king, and the second Christ). Recognizable by the poet’s wreath and lyre at his foot denoting the psalmist, and the sling in his right hand, this third David, i.e. Joris himself, is the heroic figure at right. He is at the same time chained and fighting three allegorical figures, who can be interpreted as the temptations of power (the prostrate figure in the foreground with the globe), violence (the soldier-like man at left), and the flesh (the alluring, scantily dressed woman aiming her javelin at David). The skull in their midst makes abundantly clear they, like death, need to be conquered. The man in modern clothes who has entered the arch on which the drawing is dated seems to have gained that exalted state, and offers – or receives? – plates from hands emerging from a cloud leading to a heart pierced by an arrow which may represent God’s love.
This highly personal, almost ludicrous iconography is held together by the superior quality of execution and by the curious choice for red ink, exclusively used for the figures’ carnation. The background is taken up by a beautifully detailed vista of classical inspiration, in which the influence of Jan van Scorel (1495-1562) can be discerned; compare, for instance, his drawing of the tower of Babel in the Frits Lugt Collection, Paris (inv. 5275; see K.G. Boon, The Netherlandish and German Drawings of the XVth and XVIth Centuries of the Frits Lugt Collection, Paris 1992, I, no. 182, III, pl. 44). Both in originality and quality, the drawing leaves far behind that of the other drawings attributed to Joris. It is unlikely that the composition was intended as a stained-glass design, as its to many blasphemous nature would have required more discretion. Rather, the sheet may have played a role in Joris’s activity as a teacher and sect leader, as did his numerous books, hymns and pamphlets. In the light of the discovery of the drawing, one can regret that so many more of these publications have come down to us than works of art by this fascinating figure.

Brought to you by

Pierre Etienne
Pierre Etienne International Director, Deputy Chairman, Old Master Paintings

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Considéré par certains comme ‘l’une des figures les plus épouvantables de toute l’histoire de l’art, (F. Thöne, Old Master Drawings, XIII, n° 51, octobre 1938, p. 43), David Joris est davantage connu comme leader religieux anabaptiste dans la seconde moitié des années 1530 (G.K. Waite, David Joris and Dutch Anabaptism, 1524-1543, Waterloo, Ontario, 1990). Il est baptisé à Delf en 1534 par Obbé Philips, l’un des premiers leaders du mouvement, dont Joris devient rapidement l’un des grands défenseurs. Ces idées lui valurent, ainsi qu’à sa famille et ses proches, des poursuites judiciaires qui l’amenèrent à suivre une vie itinérante – depuis Anvers jusqu’à la Frise orientale entre autres, avant de partir à Bâle. Il y prétend être un riche aristocratique sous le nom de Jan van Brugge (‘Jean de Bruges’). Son train de vie soutenu sera financé par ses suiveurs à Bâle et aux Pays-Bas et par son activité d’auteur prolifique en néerlandais, de manière anonyme. Seulement après sa mort, sa vraie identité est révélée à la population de Bâle : il est déclaré hérétique, et son corps sera exhumé et brûlé.

Joris, fils d’un membre de la chambre de rhétorique, était aussi intéressé par l’art et reçu une formation de maître verrier. Un bon nombre de projets dessinés pour vitraux, tous de style très varié, lui ont été attribués à base l'inscriptions tardives (voir, parmi d’autres, H. Koegler, ‘Einiges über David Joris als Künstler’, Oeffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel. Jahresberichte, nouvelle série, XXV-XXVII, 1928-1930, pp. 157-201 ; K.G. Boon, ‘De glasschilder David Joris, een exponent van het doperse geloof. Zijn kunst en invloed op Dirck Crabeth’, Academia analecta. Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten van België, IL, 1988, n°1, pp.117-137 ; et A. Mensger, Lichtgestalten. Zeichnungen und Glasgemälde von Holbein bis Ringler, cat. exp., Bâle, Kunstmuseum Basel, 2020, n°49-57). Les seules œuvres connues jusqu’alors avec une attribution certaine à Joris sont deux larges gravures sur bois illustrant un traité de l’artiste, Twonder boeck, daté 1542 (Koegler, op. cit., pp. 173-177, ill.). Le présent dessin, qui porte le même monogramme que sur les gravures, et de style très proche, peut maintenant être ajouté à ce corpus d’œuvres de l’artiste. Dans l’une des gravures représentant un homme nu, le visage et les pieds présentent de grandes similarités avec le dessin. Ce style s’apparente à celui de Jan Swart van Groningen (avant 1500-après 1560), qui directement ou indirectement influença Joris (T.B. Husband, The Luminous Image. Painted Glass Roundels in the Lowlands, 1480-1560, cat. exp., New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1995, pp. 166-167, n°91-96, ill.). Certaines connections stylistiques avec le travail de Dirck Crabeth (1510/1520?-1574) peuvent également être remarquées mais son activité était plus tardive que celle de Joris.

Comme avec ces deux gravures sur bois, l’iconographie de cette nouvelle découverte est loin d’être facile à expliquer. La date, 1536, inscrite dans l’arc supérieur gauche, situe le dessin l’année où, au mois de décembre, Joris commence à avoir des visions (Waite, op. cit., pp. 68-72). Il se voit lui-même comme le ‘troisième David’ (le premier David était le roi israélite, et le second le Christ). Joris est reconnaissable par la couronne et la lyre du poète à ses pieds désignant le psalmiste, et la fronde dans sa main droite : il s’agit de la figure héroïque sur la droite du dessin. Il est enchaîné et en même temps, il combat trois figures allégoriques qui peuvent être interprétées comme les tentations du pouvoir (la figure prostrée au premier-plan avec le globe), la violence (l’homme aux allures de soldat à gauche) et la chair (la femme séduisante et légèrement vêtue qui vise David avec son javelot). Le crâne entre les deux personnages principaux montre très clairement qu’ils ont besoin, comme la mort, d’être conquis. L’homme avec ses vêtements modernes qui est entré par l’arc où le dessin est daté semble en extase et offre – ou reçoit ?- une assiette de mains émergent d’un nuage mené par un cœur percé par une flèche qui pourrait représenter l’amour de Dieu.

Cette iconographie hautement personnelle et presque insensée se tient par la qualité supérieure de l'exécution et par le choix curieux de l'encre rouge, utilisée exclusivement pour la carnation des figures. L'arrière-plan est occupé par une vue d'inspiration classique, merveilleusement détaillée, dans laquelle l'influence de Jan van Scorel (1495-1562) est perceptible ; à comparer, par exemple, avec son dessin de la tour de Babel dans la Collection Frits Lugt, Paris (inv. 5275 ; voir K.G. Boon, The Netherlandish and German Drawings of the XVth and XVIth Centuries of the Frits Lugt Collection, Paris 1992, I, n°182, III, pl. 44). Tant en originalité qu'en qualité, le dessin laisse loin derrière les autres feuilles attribuées à Joris. Il est peu probable que la composition ait été destinée à un projet de vitrail, car sa nature par trop blasphématoire aurait requis davantage de discrétion. En revanche, la feuille aurait pu jouer un rôle dans l'activité de Joris en tant qu'enseignant et dirigeant de secte, comme y contribuaient ses nombreux livres, hymnes et pamphlets. À la lumière de la découverte de ce dessin, il est regrettable que très peu d’œuvres d’art de cette figure fascinante nous soient parvenues, comparé aux nombreuses publications connues.
;

Related Articles

View all
‘They had a strong belief in p auction at Christies
Heart of glass: why the world  auction at Christies
‘A whale ship was my Yale Coll auction at Christies

More from Maîtres Anciens - Dessins, Peintures, Sculptures

View All
View All