ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN (PARIS 1755-1842)
ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN (PARIS 1755-1842)
ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN (PARIS 1755-1842)
2 More
This item will be transferred to an offsite wareho… Read more
ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN (PARIS 1755-1842)

Portrait de Joseph Hyacinthe François-de-Paule de Rigaud, comte de Vaudreuil (1740-1817), assis dans un fauteuil

Details
ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN (PARIS 1755-1842)
Portrait de Joseph Hyacinthe François-de-Paule de Rigaud, comte de Vaudreuil (1740-1817), assis dans un fauteuil
huile sur toile
129,5 x 96,5 cm (51 x 38 in.)
Provenance
Vraisemblablement collection Elisabeth Louise Vigée le Brun (1755-1842), hôtel du Coq, 99 rue Saint-Lazare, Paris, France ; son inventaire après-décès, 1842 (comme 'accroché dans le salon principal donnant sur le jardin : « Un portrait peint à l’huile, à mi-Jambe de Mr le comte de Vaudreuil, en habit de cour, placé dans un cadre de Bois doré… »') ; puis par héritage à sa nièce, Charlotte-Élisabeth-Louise ‘Caroline’ Vigée (1791–1864), épouse dès 1809 de son oncle maternel Jean Nicolas ‘Louis’ de Rivière (1778–1861), Paris, Louveciennes et Versailles, France.
Peut-être acquis à ces derniers soit par un héritier de Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, prince de Bénévent et prince de Talleyrand (1754-1838), soit par un certain Dup*** de G***, Paris, France, avant 1847 ;
Vente posthume Talleyrand et d’autres œuvres appartenant au cabinet de M. Dup*** de G***, hôtel des ventes mobilières, rue des Jeûneurs, Paris, (Me Ridel), 9-10 mars 1847, lot 73 (comme ‘Portrait de M. le comte de Vaudreuil, costumé en habit français, assis et vu jusqu’aux genoux').
Peut-être acquis lors de cette dernière vente par un membre de la famille de Clermont-Tonnerre ; puis par descendance aux actuels propriétaires, Paris, France.

Nota : Catalogue d’une belle collection de Tableaux anciens et modernes des école espagnole, italienne, flamande, hollandaise et française provenant de la galerie de M. le Prince de Talleyrand, et du cabinet de M. Dup*** de G***, Paris, Hôtel de Ventes Mobilières, 16 rue des Jeuneurs, salle n° 1, 7-8 mars 1847, par le ministère du commissaire-priseur Maître Nicolas-Napoléon-Bonaventure Ridel. Dans la même vente figuraient d’autres tableaux en provenance de la succession de Vigée Le Brun, notamment le portrait de la comtesse Du Barry tenant des fleurs (n° 69 ; vente Christie’s, New York, 1er mai 2019, n° 33) ; Amphion jouant de la lyre à côté de trois naïades (n° 70 ; cf. Carole Blumenfeld, Rome vs Athènes : les deux visages de la femme sous la Révolution française, cat. d’exp. Grasse, Musée Fragonard, 5 mai-22 septembre 2019, n° 6) ; le portrait de la cantatrice Angelica Catalani (n° 71 ; autrefois au Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth) ; et un portrait à mi-corps de l’impératrice de Russie, Élisabeth Alexievna (n° 74).
Literature
É. L. Vigée Le Brun, Souvenirs de Madame Louise-Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, de l’Académie royale de Paris, de Rouen, de Saint-Luc de Rome et d’Arcadie, de Parme et de Bologne, de Saint-Pétersbourg, de Berlin, de Genève et Avignon, Paris, 1835, I, p. 332.

Cette œuvre sera incluse au catalogue raisonné des peintures, pastels et dessins de Vigée Le Brun que prépare Joseph Baillio.
Special notice

This item will be transferred to an offsite warehouse after the sale. Please refer to department for information about storage charges and collection details.
Post lot text
ÉLISABETH LOUISE VIGÉE LE BRUN, PORTRAIT OF JOSEPH HYACINTHE FRANÇOIS-DE-PAULE DE RIGAUD, COMTE DE VAUDREUIL (1740-1817), SITTING IN AN ARMCHAIR, OIL ON CANVAS

The dashing Joseph Hyacinthe François-de-Paule de Rigaud, Count of Vaudreuil, was born in the Caribbean, in the French part of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti), on 2 March 1740. The event probably occurred in the main house of a large agricultural exploitation, principally of sugarcane, located in a canton of the parish of Torbeck. This location within the district of Les Cayes was located 40 leagues from Port-au-Prince (Cf. Médéric Louis Élie Moreau de Saint-Méry, Description topographique, physique, civile, politique et historique de la partie française de l’isle de Saint-Domingue, new edition by Blanche Maurel and Étienne Taillemite, vol. III, Paris, Société de l’Histoire des Colonies Françaises and Librairie Larose, Paris, 1958, pp. 1326-1334.). His father was Joseph Hyacinthe, Marquis of Vaudreuil (1706–1764), commanding general and military governor of the island [consult La famille de Rigaud de Vaudreuil by the Quebec-based historian and archivist Pierre-Georges Roy, published in 1938], and his mother, born Marie Claire Françoise Guyot de la Mirande (1709–1778), was the widow of a rich planter and merchant, Dominique Charles Hérard († 1727). His paternal grandfather, a native of Languedoc, had been the governor of New France in North America, which at the time included Canada, Acadia and French Labrador, as well as the vast Louisiana Territory.

The young count resided in Paris before entering the army of Louis XV. He was eighteen when Drouais portrayed him in front of a large map of the Leeward Islands (see Humphrey Wine, The Eighteenth Century French Paintings (The National Gallery Catalogues), London, 2018, pp. 178-186, illustrated in colour). He served during the Seven Years’ War as a second lieutenant of the gendarmes écossais in the general staff of the Maréchal Prince de Soubise. In 1770, he was appointed brigadier in the Dauphin’s cavalry regiment of dragoons, and that same year he was decorated with the royal and military Order of Saint-Louis. In 1780 he was promoted to the rank of maréchal de camp.

Once discharged from the army, the ambitious Creole gentleman quickly began to frequent the high society of Paris and Versailles. (In this context, consult Benedetta Craveri, Les derniers libertins, (translated in French from the Italian by Dominique Vittoz), Flammarion, Paris, 2016, pp. 347-398.) Previously, Vaudreuil had had a relationship with a woman who gave him an illegitimate daughter in 1766. She was christened in Chartres under the name Marie Hyacinthe Albertine de Fierval, and in 1784 she married one of her father’s protégés, Pierre Charles d’Avrange de Noiseville, general secretary of the Grand Falconer of France. Mme de Noiseville played an important role in the life of Vigée Le Brun during and after the Bourbon Restoration.

He quickly began a long-term romantic liaison with his ravishing distant cousin, the Comtesse (later Duchesse) de Polignac, née Yolande Martine Gabrielle de Polastron, whose husband was a captain of the Royal-Dragoons: the Count (future Duc) Armand ‘Jules’ François de Polignac, owner of the Château de Claye in Brie. In 1775, this charming woman of ancient nobility but of no great fortune attracted the attention of the young Queen Marie-Antoinette, who was tormented by the court's rules of etiquette; and Gabrielle became her most pampered friend. In 1780, Vaudreuil was named Grand Falconer of France in the King’s Household. Moreover, he was the closest friend of the king’s younger brother, the Comte d'Artois, whose countless indiscretions and libertine follies were costly to the state. In 1782, Vaudreuil accompanied ‘his’ young prince to Spain, to the great siege of Gibraltar. (See the Journal politique, ou Gazette des Gazettes, April 1782, pp. 36-37 and the relationship as described by Alexandre Ballet, Vaudreuil’s first valet de chambre: ‘Voyage du comte d’Artois à Gibraltar. 1782’, Revue rétrospective ou Bibliothèque Historique contenant des mémoires et des documents authentiques inédits et originaux, 3rd ser., vol. I, H. Fournier printing office, Paris, 1838, vol. I, pp. 193-220 and 289-323, vol. II, pp. 41-87 and 97-153.) During the French Revolution, Vigée Le Brun asked her brother, the writer Étienne Vigée, to burn the letters that Vaudreuil had sent her from Spain.

Despite a lively and sometimes short-tempered personality, the count was the guiding spirit of the Polignac coterie, and the queen had a hard time tolerating his overbearing behaviour. Having accumulated all sorts of favours – including, in 1782, the role of governess to the royal children –, Gabrielle de Polignac secured well-remunerated positions for her lover through her influence on the queen. He was able to help himself to large sums of money from the kingdom’s coffers. These operations were facilitated thanks to the connivance of the Controller-General of Finances, Charles Alexandre de Calonne, who had gained access to that responsibility through Vaudreuil's skilful scheming. (Two other of the king’s ministers and Marshals of France, the Marquis de Castries as Secretary of State for the Navy and the Marquis de Ségur as Secretary of State for War – owed him their positions in the Royal Council.) According to the author of moires Secrets: ‘In addition to his great qualities as a minister, Monsieur de Calonne has those of a courtier and man of society. He is in good standing with the Polignacs and Vaudreuils, who speak in a familiar tone.’ (Mémoires secrets pour servir à l’histoire de la République des lettres en France…, ou Journal dun Observateur, vol. XXV, London, John Adamson, 1786, p. 217 [article dated 7 April 1784].) These abuses cost the queen, and those around her most opposed to the reforms advocated by the philosophes of the Enlightement, whatever popularity they still enjoyed.

The artists and writers the comte protected called him ‘Vaudreuil-Mécène’. (The most complete and best-documented study of Vaudreuil as a collector is to be found in the remarkable book by Colin Bailey, Patriotic Taste: Collecting Modern Art in Pre-Revolutionary Paris, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2002, pp. 170-194.) Throughout the 1780s, he was the most important private client of Mme Vigée Le Brun and her husband, the art dealer Jean-Baptiste Pierre Le Brun. Among other masterpieces by the woman painter, he could boast that he owned Self-portrait in a Straw Hat (1782, private collection); the pastel portrait of Aglaé de Polignac, Duchesse Guiche (1784, private collection); the Bacchante; and the portrait of the actress, singer and dancer Madame Dugazon in the Role of Nina (1787, private collection).

It is largely thanks to Vaudreuil that the salon of the supremely beautiful Mme Le Brun became fashionable. According to the chronicler Mouffle d’Angerville: ‘Recently [the artist] held a concert where M. Garat sang; Messieurs de Vaudreuil, de Galifet, de Polignac, and many fashionable courtiers were there; it was the day of the Queen’s ball. The gentlemen agreed that Mme Le Brun’s gatherings were infinitely more amusing than those of Versailles, and that they would remain there as long as she wanted; and indeed, they only arrived at Her Majesty’s ball at two or three o’clock in the morning, leaving a vacuum in the festivities of the day.’ (Mémoires secrets pour servir à l'histoire de la République des Lettres en France depuis 1762 jusqu'à nos jours, 24 February 1783, vol. XXII, pp. 103-104.) It was in his honour, and that of the financier Simon Boutin, that in 1788, after the comte's return from a trip to Italy, that she held her famous Grecian supper at the apartment where she lived on the first floor of the Hôtel de Lubert on rue de Cléry. It was one of the most memorable social events of the decade in Paris.

According to certain contemporaries, including the baronne de Staël and Thomas Blaikie – who saw her at the picturesque hunt château of Gennevilliers that Vaudreuil had purchased from the duc de Fronsac –, he and the portrait artist were lovers. In March 1783, the Scottish landscape gardener, who had designed a large portion of the park of the Château de Bagatelle for the comte d'Artois, wrote in his diary that he had encountered the artist while visiting Gennevilliers: ‘Went one day with the Compte de Vaudreulle to see his Gardins at Genvillier those Gardins having been changed by one Labryer [Alexandre Louis Étable de la Brière] Architect but in such a way that there was no observations of Any perspective; the Compte is grand Fauconnier of France so that he came to Bagatelle with the Queens carriage and Six to take me to Genvillier; those Gardens I had allready seen; here I met with the fameuse painteresse Mme Labrun who creticised very much upon the works done by Labruryer; this woman has a great taste and is really esteemed one of the first painters in France; I was exceedingly glade to have the oppertunity of explaining myself before so knowing a person; we examined the Gardins explaining all the differant Landscaps which I showed might be done this pleased Mme Lebrun exceedingly as she is the Mistress of the Compt de Vaudreull.’ (Thomas Blaikie. Diary of a Scotch Gardener, at the French Court at the End of the Eighteenth Century, ed. Francis Birelle, London, George Routledge, 1931, pp. 179-180.)

On New Year’s day 1784, the year that Mme Le Brun painted his portrait to commemorate the event, the comte de Vaudreuil was made Knight of the Order of the Holy Spirit by Louis XVI. Vaudreuil, who sat for his friend at the age of forty-four, is dressed in formal coat and tails lined in white silk and a vest – all in a brown fabric resplendant with gold braid, trim and beads – an attire complete by a pait of black silk breeches. These elegant garments are completed by such accessories as a white chiffon neck scarf, a fine lace jabot and cuffs and white stockings. The large blue sash of the Order of the Holy Spirit crosses his torso diagonally, and on his chest is sewn the silver badge of hte same knightly order. Moreover, the red silk rosette and ribbon of the royal military order of Saint-Louis that he received in 1770 are affixed to his jacket. Under his left arm he clasps a tricorn adorned with white plumes, and his hand holds the handle of a ceremonial sword, of which the blade is inserted into an ivory sheath. He sits in a luxurious chair made for him by Georges Jacob.

Vaudreuil was an accomplished amateur actor, and the artist seems to have captured his talent as a performer; he lays his right arm on a table covered with a green velvet cloth, and appears to be telling a pleasant anecdote as he gesticulates with his hand like one of the characters in the light-hearted comedies that he interpreted with such wit. (It could be that the pose and the elegant clothing and furniture in this portrait inspired François Gérard when, in 1808, he painted the portrait of the Foreign Minister under Napoleon, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord [Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mrs Charles Wrightsman Gift, acq. n° 2012.348], since Gérard knew both Vaudreuil and Vigée Le Brun well.)

Two of Vaudreuil’s literary protégés celebrated the friendship between the aristocrat and his favourite artist, each in his own way. The first was Ponce Denis Écouchard Lebrun, known as ‘Lebrun-Pindare’, who praised the courtier and the artist in the ephemeral verse of a poem entitled ‘L’Enchanteur et la Fée’ (‘The Magician and the Faery’):

Heaven, as an ultimate blessing
Gave him a charming Faery as his friend,
Worthy indeed of my Enchanter.
She was possessed of every quality:
wit, talent, grace, ingenuousness;
A magical deity whose expert hand
Painted the soul and brought canvas to life.
You will say that such miracles no longer occur,
That the Fairy and the Enchanter have crossed the dark waters.
No, my friend, there they are, V*** and Le Brun.
They have transformed my tale into reality.

And the moralist Chamfort – to whom Vaudreuil often gave room and board in his townhouse on rue de la Chaise, and who will show his ingratitude by becoming one of the eulogists of the Revolution before committing suicide – composed a witty piece of verse published in the Correspondance Littéraire that had many a spiteful person sniggering:

Rhyming verse completed at Gennevilliers, at the home of the Count of Vaudreuil by Mr de Chamfort of the Académie française for Madame Le Brun.

On the throne or among the — ferns,
At the court or in a — hamlet,
Le Brun, queen or — shepherdess,
Would play on my lute or even my — flute.

(Friedrich Melchior, baron Grimm et al., Correspondance littéraire, philosophique et critique par Grimm, Diderot, Raynal, Meister, etc., ed. Maurice Tourneux, vol. XIV, Paris, 1880, October 1785, pp. 222-223.)

In her famous Souvenirs, the artist raved about ‘l’Enchanteur’ (‘The Magician’), revealing a true affection on her part. (For more about Vigée Le Brun and her relations with the Count of Vaudreuil, consult Geneviève Haroche-Bouzinac, Louise Vigée Le Brun, histoire d’un regard, Paris, Flammarion (Grandes Biographies), 2011, particularly pp. 119-125.) Indeed, if she had had a lover, it would surely have been Vaudreuil, who was tall and handsome, with features only spoiled by traces of smallpox, an imperfection that she perfectly managed to portray that same year in her magnificent portrait of the minister Calonne.

High born, the comte de Vaudreuil was even more blessed by nature than by fortune, though he was gifted in every way. In addition to the advantages of his high-class position, he showed all the qualities and graces that made him a delightful man: he carried himself with remarkable dignity and elegance; his glance was pleasant and refined, with extremely mobile features, reflecting his active mind; and his kind smile would appear at first greeting. The comte de Vaudreuil had a great deal of intellect, but you would have been led to believe that he only used his words as a foil for yours, so kind and gracious was his way of listening; depending on the serious or simply pleasant tenor of the conversation, he would adapt it to the proper tone or nuance, for he was as educated as he was light-hearted. He was an admirable raconteur, and I know poems he wrote that the most discerning people would cite with praise, but those verses were only read by his friends; he was even less willing to publish them since he allowed himself to write some of them in the spirit and form of a satirical epigram; he required truth in order to conduct himself so, and wrongful acts would have revolted his noble, pure soul; and one might say that while he showed little pity for anything vile, he was enthusiastically uplifted by everything that was proper. No one so enthusiastically served those who possessed his respect; if someone attacked his friends, he defended them with such energy that callous people accused him of exaggeration. — ‘You must judge me so,” he once replied to a narcissist with whom we were acquainted, “because I understand what is good, and you understand nothing.’

The company he sought was that of the most distinguished artists and literary figures; they were among his friends, which he kept throughout his life, even those whose political opinions he did not at all share.

He passionately loved all the arts, and his knowledge of painting was quite remarkable. As his fortune enabled him to satisfy his very costly tastes, he had a gallery of paintings by the greatest masters of various schools; his sitting room was filled with precious furniture and ornaments of the best taste. He frequently threw magnificent, enchanting parties, to the point that he was known as ‘the enchanter’; however, his greatest joy was to relieve the unfortunate; consequently, how many were ungrateful to him! (Vigée Le Brun, Souvenirs, cited in the Bibliography, vol. I, pp. 210-212.)

The old comtesse de Boigne described Vaudreuil as an insensitive, superficial man: ‘I often saw the comte de Vaudreuil in London, but I never perceived the distinction with which his contemporaries honoured him. […] At Mme Lebrun’s home, he would swoon before a painting and patronized artists. He lived on familiar terms with them and kept his haughty attitude for the salon of Mme de Polignac and his ingratitude for the Queen, of whom I heard him speak with the upmost impropriety. Having emigrated and grown old, all that remained was the ridiculousness of all his pretensions and the indignity of seeing his wife’s lovers finance his house with gifts she was supposedly winning in the lottery.' (Récits d’une tante : Mémoires de la comtesse de Boigne, née [Éléonore Adèle] d’Osmond, published by Charles Nicoullaud, 3rd ed., vol. I, Paris, Librairie Plon, 1907, pp. 144-145.)

Before the French Revolution, Vaudreuil’s spending far exceeded his enormous personal revenues and, when Calonne fell from grace in April 1787, his credit was totally exhausted. In the night between the 16th and the 17th of July 1789, he left Paris for Switzerland in the company of the comte d'Artois, the Polignacs, and other members of their society that a great proportion of the French population loathed. He left behind all his possessions, including his collection, of which a small portion was sent to him later in London by his cousin, the etcher Jean Philippe Le Gentil, comte de Paroy (1750–1824), and a fellow Creole, Colonel Pierre François Venault de Charmilly (?–1815), who later put it up for sale.

Vaudreuil and his expatriate friends wandered from one country to the next throughout the entire Revolution, the Consulat, and Napoleonic Empire. Gabrielle de Polignac having died in Austria in December 1793 two months after the execution of Marie Antoinette, he married a young relative in London in 1795, Victoire Joséphine Marie Hyacinthe de Rigaud de Vaudreuil. They had two sons, Charles-Philippe-Joseph-Alfred (1796-1880) and Victor-Louis-Alfred (1799-1834). Vigée Le Brun drew pastel portraits of the mother and both sons in 1804. (Cf. Neil Jeffares, Dictionary of pastellists before 1800, online edition —http://www.pastellists.com/Articles/VigeeLeBrun.pdf—pp. 15-16, no J.76.39, J.76.391 and J.76.392; two of these pastels are reproduced in colour.) Victor-Louis had a daughter with his spouse Anne-Louise Collot, Marie-Charlotte de Rigaud de Vaudreuil (1830-1900), who married comte Gédéon de Clermont-Tonnerre. Their post-mortem auction included a great number of portraits of her paternal grandfather’s family.

After definitively returning to Paris from his travels with the Bourbons, Vaudreuil was appointed by Louis XVIII to the Chamber des Pairs and to the Institut, and he was granted the title of Governor of the Louvre Palace, where he died on 17 January 1817 at the age of seventy-seven. His remains were laid to rest in the Saint-Pierre-du-Calvaire cemetery on the rue du Mont-Cenis, where they were joined by those of other members of his family.

Among the lists of the artistic productions which appear at the end of each of three volumes of the original edition of her famous Souvenirs, published by the bookseller Hippolyte Fournier between 1835 and 1837, Louise Vigée Le Brun presented one original and five copies (that is to say "replicas") of her portrait of Vaudreuil under the year 1784, as well as ‘two busts’ executed in Paris after he returned from emigration. (Vigée Le Brun, Souvenirs, vol. I, 1835, p. 332 and vol. III, 1837, p. 331.) One of the later repetitions is an oval portraying the model in a black suit and yellow waistcoat; it is part of a private collection.

The work generally considered as the first version of the half-lenght portrait of Vaudreuil – a work that was directly passed from Vaudreuil to his granddaughter, the aforementioned comtesse Gédéon de Clermont-Tonnerre (it is reproduced in a heliogravure in the frontispiece of each of the two volumes of La Correspondance intime du comte de Vaudreuil et du comte d’Artois pendant l’Émigration (1789-1815) published by Léonce Pingaud in 1889) – is in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. The comte is shown seated at a wooden table, probably octagonal in shape, with spiral legs and an edge carved in relief. (Cf. Joseph Baillio, Élisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun (1755-1842), Fort Worth, Kimbell Museum of Art, 1982, pp. 51-54, n° 14; Paris, Grand Palais National Galleries, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, 23 September 2015-11 January 2016, pp. 166-167 and 350, n° 50; New York City, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, 9 February -15 May 2016 and Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, 10 June-11 September 2016, pp. 96-97 and n° 21.)

By far the finest example of the bust-lenght portrait of Vaudreuil belongs to the Musée Jacquemart-André in Paris; in it the model wears a blue velvet jacket with a wide collar lined with white silk and adorned with a lawn jabot, a striped black-and-ochre waistcoat, and his knightly medals, including – on the chest – a simple red ribbon of the Order of Saint-Louis, without the cross, and the blue sash and badge of the Order of the Saint Esprit. This image, whose modeling is exquisite and whose depictions of features such as the eyes, half-open mouth and powdered hair are so lifelike leads us to believe that Vigée Le Brun executed it in the presence of the model as a preparatory study that would enable her to execute the two half-body portraits of the subject. The oval bust-lenght portrait, exhibited recently in the town of Versailles — Musée Lambinet, De la cour à la ville sous les règnes de Louis XV et Louis XVI : Cent portraits pour un siècle, 6 November 2019-1 March 2020, pp. 93-95, n° 42—lacks vitality, and the rendering of the hair appears rather harsh and even metallic.

We would like to thank Joseph Baillio for writing the above catalogue entry.
Sale room notice
Veuillez noter que certaines précisions relatives à la provenance ont été apportées à la version en ligne.

Please note that further information regarding the provenance has been added to the online version.

Brought to you by

Pierre Etienne
Pierre Etienne International Director, Deputy Chairman, Old Master Paintings

Check the condition report or get in touch for additional information about this

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

Le fringant Joseph Hyacinthe François-de-Paule de Rigaud, comte de Vaudreuil, naquit aux Caraïbes dans la partie française de l’île de Saint-Domingue le 2 mars 1740. L’événement eut sans doute lieu dans l’habitation d’une importante agricole, essentiellement sucrière, située sur un canton de la paroisse de Torbec. Dans l’arrondissement des Cayes, l’endroit était situé au Cap-Haïtien à près de 40 lieues de Port-au-Prince. (Cf. Médéric Louis Élie Moreau de Saint-Méry, Description topographique, physique, civile, politique et historique de la partie française de l’isle de Saint-Domingue, nlle éd. par Blanche Maurel et Étienne Taillemite, t. III, Paris, Société de l’Histoire des Colonies Françaises et Librairie Larose, Paris, 1958, pp. 1326-1334.) Ses parents étaient Joseph Hyacinthe, marquis de Vaudreuil (1706–1764), commandant-général et gouverneur militaire de la colonie [consulter La famille de Rigaud de Vaudreuil par l’historien et archiviste québécois, Pierre-Georges Roy, ouvrage publié en 1938], et de son épouse, née Marie Claire Françoise Guyot de la Mirande (1709–1778), la veuve d’un riche planteur et marchand, Dominique Charles Hérard († 1727). Son grand-père paternel, originaire du Languedoc, avait été gouverneur de la Nouvelle France en Amérique septentrionale qui à l’époque comprenait le Canada, l’Acadie et le Labrador français et tout le vaste territoire de la Louisiane.

Le jeune comte vivait à Paris avant d’entrer dans l’armée de Louis XV. Il avait dix-huit ans quand Drouais le portraitura devant une grande carte des Îles-sous-le-vent (Voir Humphrey Wine, The Eighteenth Century French Paintings (The National Gallery Catalogues), Londres, 2018, pp. 178-186, repro. en coul.). Il servit durant la guerre de Sept Ans dans l’état-major du maréchal prince de Soubise comme sous-lieutenant des gendarmes écossais. En 1770 on le nomma brigadier de dragons dans le régiment du Dauphin, et la même année il fut décoré de l’ordre royal et militaire de Saint-Louis. En 1780 il fut promu maréchal de camp.

Sorti de l’armée, l’ambitieux gentilhomme créole s’empressa de fréquenter la société mondaine parisienne et versaillaise. (Dans ce contexte, consulter Benedetta Craveri, Les derniers libertins, (trad. de l’italien par Dominique Vittoz), Flammarion, Paris, 2016, pp. 347-398.) Précédemment, Vaudreuil avait eu une relation avec une femme qui lui donna en 1766 une fille naturelle baptisée à Chartres sous le nom de Marie Hyacinthe Albertine de Fierval, laquelle en 1784 épousa un protégé de son père, Pierre Charles d’Avrange de Noiseville, secrétaire général de la Grande Fauconnerie de France. Mme de Noiseville tiendra pendant et après la Restauration des Bourbons une place importante dans la vie de Vigée Le Brun.

Il eut tôt fait d’entamer une liaison amoureuse durable avec une ravissante cousine à la mode de Bretagne, la comtesse (plus tard duchesse) de Polignac, née Yolande Martine Gabrielle de Polastron, dont le mari était un capitaine de Royal-Dragons, le comte (futur duc) Armand ‘Jules’ François de Polignac, propriétaire du château de Claye en Brie. En 1775, cette femme aimable de vieille noblesse mais sans grande fortune attira l’attention de la jeune reine Marie-Antoinette, que les règles de l’étiquette de la cour assommaient, et Gabrielle devint son amie la plus gâtée. En 1780 Vaudreuil fut fait Grand Fauconnier de France dans la Maison du Roi. Il était de surcroît l’ami le plus proche du jeune frère du roi, le comte d’Artois, dont on ne peut détailler les frasques et les folies libertines qui étaient si coûteuses à l’État. En 1782 Vaudreuil accompagna « son » prince en Espagne et au grand siège de Gibraltar. (Voir le Journal politique, ou Gazette des Gazettes, avril 1782, pp. 36-37 et la relation rédigée par Alexandre Ballet, le premier valet de chambre de Vaudreuil : « Voyage du comte d’Artois à Gibraltar. 1782 », Revue rétrospective ou Bibliothèque Historique contenant des mémoires et des documents authentiques inédits et originaux, 3ème sér., vol. I, Imprimerie de H. Fournier, Paris, 1838, vol. I, pp. 193-220 et 289-323, vol. II, pp. 41-87 et 97-153.) Pendant la Révolution, Vigée Le Brun demandera à son frère, l’écrivain Étienne Vigée, de brûler les lettres que le comte lui avait envoyées d’Espagne.

Malgré un tempérament vif et parfois emporté, le comte fut l’âme de la coterie Polignac, et la reine eut du mal tolérer son comportement autoritaire. Ayant cumulé toutes sortes de faveurs, dont la charge en 1782 de gouvernante des enfants royaux, Gabrielle de Polignac obtint pour son amant par son ascendant sur la souveraine des postes bien rémunérés. Il put bénéficier d’importantes rentrées d’argent tirées des coffres de l’état, opérations facilitées avec la connivance du Contrôleur général des Finances, Charles Alexandre de Calonne, qui avait accédé à cette charge grâce à ses habiles intrigues. (Deux autres ministres du roi - les maréchaux marquis de Castres pour le département de la Marine et de Ségur pour le département de la Guerre - lui devaient leurs places dans le Conseil du roi.) Selon l’auteur des moires Secrets : « Outre les grandes qualités du ministre, M. de Calonne a celles du courtisan et de l’homme de société. Il est très bien avec les Polignac, les Vaudreuil qui le tutoient familièrement. » (Mémoires secrets pour servir à l’histoire de la République des lettres en France…, ou Journal dun Observateur, vol. XXV, Londres, John Adamson, 1786, p. 217 [article en date du 7 avril 1784].) Ces abus feront perdre à la reine ce qui restait de sa popularité, et à ceux de son cercle qui représentaient la partie la plus opposée aux réformes prônées par les philosophes des Lumières.

Les artistes et écrivains qu’il protégeait l’appelait « Vaudreuil-Mécène ». (L’étude la plus complète et la mieux documentée sur Vaudreuil en tant que collectionneur se trouve dans le remarquable ouvrage de Colin Bailey, Patriotic Taste : Collecting Modern Art in Pre-Revolutionary Paris, Yale University Press, New Haven et Londres, 2002, pp. 170-194.) Au cours des années 1780, il fut le client privé le plus important de l'artiste et de son mari, le marchand d’art Jean-Baptiste Pierre Le Brun. Entre autres chefs-d’œuvre de la femme peintre, il pouvait se vanter de posséder l’Autoportrait au chapeau de paille (1782, collection privée), le portrait au pastel d’Aglaé de Polignac, duchesse de Guiche (1784, collection privée), la Bacchante (Musée Nissim de Camondo, Paris) et le portrait de la comédienne, chanteuse et danseuse Mme Dugazon dans le rôle de Nina (1787, collection privée).

C’est en grande partie grâce à Vaudreuil que le salon de Mme Le Brun, qui était suprêmement belle, devint à la mode. Selon le chroniqueur Mouffle d’Angerville : « Dernièrement [l’artiste] avoit un concert où chantait M. Garat ; MM. de Vaudreuil, de Galifet, de Polignac, grand nombre des agréables de la cour y étoient ; c’étoit le jour du bal de la Reine. Ces messieurs convinrent qu’on s’amusoit infiniment plus chez Mad. Le Brun qu’à Versailles, qu’ils resteroient chez elle tant qu’elle voudroit ; et en effet ils ne se rendirent chez S.M. qu’à deux ou trois heures du matin ; ce qui avoit formé pour ce jour-là un vide dans la fête. » (Mémoires secrets pour servir à l'histoire de la République des Lettres en France depuis 1762 jusqu'à nos jours, le 24 février 1783, vol. XXII, pp. 103-104.) Ce fut en son honneur et celui du financier Simon Boutin qu’elle organisa en 1788, après le retour du comte d’un voyage en Italie, son célèbre souper grec dans l’appartement qu’elle occupait à l’étage noble de l’Hôtel de Lubert dans la rue de Cléry, l’un des événements mondains les plus marquants de la décennie à Paris.

D’après certains contemporains, entre autres la baronne de Staël et le jardinier-paysagiste écossais Thomas Blaikie, lequel l’a vue au château de chasse de Gennevilliers que Vaudreuil avait acquis du duc de Fronsac, lui et la portraitiste auraient été amants. En mars 1783, Blaikie, qui avait dessiné une grande partie du parc du château de Bagatelle pour le comte d’Artois, nota dans son journal qu’en visitant Gennevilliers il rencontra Vigée Le Brun : Went one day with the Compte de Vaudreulle to see his Gardins at Genvillier those Gardins having been changed by one Labryer [Alexandre Louis Étable de la Brière] Architect but in such a way that there was no observations of Any perspective ; the Compte is grand Fauconnier of France so that he came to Bagatelle with the Queens carriage and Six to take me to Genvillier ; those Gardens I had allready seen ; here I met with the fameuse painteresse Mme Labrun who creticised very much upon the works done by Labruryer; this woman has a great taste and is really esteemed one of the first painters in France ; I was exceedingly glade to have the oppertunity of explaining myself before so knowing a person ; we examined the Gardins explaining all the differant Landscaps which I showed might be done this pleased Mme Lebrun exceedingly as she is the Mistress of the Compt de Vaudreull. (Thomas Blaikie. Diary of a Scotch Gardener, at the French Court at the End of the Eighteenth Century, éd. Francis Birelle, Londres, George Routledge, 1931, pp. 179-180.)

Le jour de l’an 1784, l’année où son portrait fut réalisé par Mme Le Brun pour commémorer l’événement, le comte de Vaudreuil fut reçu par Louis XVI chevalier de l’ordre du Saint-Esprit. Vaudreuil, qui donna des séances de pose à son amie alors qu’il avait quarante-quatre ans, est vêtu d’un habit doublé de soie blanche et d’un gilet bruns à la française chamarrés de galons, de passementeries et de perles d’or, costume assorti d’un pantalon de soie noire. Cette élégante tenue est complétée par des accessoires tels que le tour de cou de mousseline blanche, un jabot et des poignets en fines dentelles et des bas blancs. Le grand cordon bleu du Saint-Esprit traverse en diagonale son torse et sur la poitrine est cousue la plaque en fils d’argent du même ordre de chevalerie. En outre sur son costume sont attachés la rosette et le petit ruban de soie rouge l’ordre royal et militaire de Saint-Louis. Sous le bras gauche il a enfoncé un tricorne garni de plumes blanches et il tient la poignée d’une épée de cérémonie dont la lame est enfoncée dans un fourreau d’ivoire. Il est assis dans un beau fauteuil de Georges Jacob.

Vaudreuil fut un acteur amateur accompli, et l’artiste semble avoir saisi sa ressemblance en situation ; il pose son bras droit sur une table recouverte d’un tapis de velours vert et semble raconter une anecdote plaisante en gesticulant de la main comme un personnage dans une des comédies légères qu’il interprétait avec tant d’esprit. (Se pourrait-il que la pose et l’habillement élégants ainsi que le bel ameublement dans ce portrait aient pu inspirer François Gérard quand il portraitura en 1808 le ministre des Affaires Étrangères de Napoléon, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Périgord [Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mrs Charles Wrightsman Gift, n° d’acq. 2012.348], qui connaissait bien Vaudreuil et Vigée Le Brun.)

Deux protégés littéraires de Vaudreuil ont célébré, chacun à sa façon, l’amitié entre l’aristocrate et son artiste préférée. Le premier, Ponce Denis Écouchard Lebrun, dit ‘Lebrun-Pindare’, Lebrun encensait le courtisan et l’artiste dans des vers éphémères intitulés « L’Enchanteur et la Fée » :

Le Ciel, pour comble de faveur,
Lui donna pour Amie une charmante Fée,
Bien digne de mon Enchanteur.
Elle avait tout, esprit, talens, grâces, candeur :
Magique Déité, de qui la main savante
Peignait l’âme, et rendait une toile vivante.
Il n’est plus, direz-vous, de ces prodiges-là ;
La Fée et l’Enchanteur ont passé l’Onde noire.
Non, mes Amis ; V*** et Le Brun que voilà,
Ont changé mon Conte en Histoire.

Et le moraliste Chamfort, que Vaudreuil logeait souvent chez lui dans son hôtel de la rue de la Chaise et qui montrera son ingratitude en devenant l’un des chantres de la Révolution avant qu’il ne se donne la mort, composa une facétie publiée dans la Correspondance Littéraire qui a dû faire ricaner bien des gens malveillants :

Bouts-rimés remplis à Gennevilliers, chez M. le comte de Vaudreuil, par M. de Chamfort, de l’Académie française, pour Mme Le Brun.

Sur le trône ou sur la — fougère,
À la cour ou dans un — hameau,
Le Brun, souveraine ou — bergère,
Animerait mon luth ou bien mon — chalumeau.

(Friedrich Melchior, Baron Grimm et al., Correspondance littéraire, philosophique et critique par Grimm, Diderot, Raynal, Meister, etc., éd. Maurice Tourneux, t. XIV, Paris, 1880, octobre 1785, pp. 222-223.)

Dans ses célèbres Souvenirs, l’artiste ne tarit pas d’éloges sur « l’Enchanteur », ce qui trahit une véritable tendresse de sa part. (Sur Vigée Le Brun et ses liens avec le comte de Vaudreuil, consulter Geneviève Haroche-Bouzinac, Louise Vigée Le Brun, histoire d’un regard, Paris, Flammarion (Grandes Biographies), 2011, surtout pp. 119-125.) En fait, si elle eut un amant ce fut sûrement Vaudreuil qui était grand et bien fait, avec une physionomie qui n’était gâtée que par des traces de la petite vérole, imperfection qu’elle sut décrire parfaitement la même année dans son magnifique portrait du ministre Calonne.

Né dans un rang élevé, le comte de Vaudreuil devait encore plus à la nature qu’à la fortune, quoique celle-ci l’eût comblé de tous ses dons. Aux avantages que donne une haute position dans le monde il joignait toutes les qualités, toutes les grâces qui rendent un homme aimable…, son maintien avait une noblesse et une élégance remarquables ; son regard était doux et fin, sa physionomie extrêmement mobile comme ses idées, et son sourire obligeant prévenait pour lui au premier abord. Le comte de Vaudreuil avait beaucoup d’esprit, mais on était tenté de croire qu’il n’ouvrait la bouche que pour faire valoir le vôtre, tant il vous écoutait d’une manière aimable et gracieuse ; soit que la conversation fût sérieuse ou plaisante, il en savait prendre tous les tons, toutes les nuances, car il avait autant d’instruction que de gaieté ; il contait admirablement, et je connais des vers de lui que les gens les plus difficiles citeraient avec éloge ; mais ces vers n’ont été lus que par ses amis ; il désirait d’autant moins les répandre, qu’il s’est permis d’employer dans quelques-uns l’esprit et la forme de l’épigramme ; il fallait à la vérité, pour qu’il agît ainsi, qu’une mauvaise action eût révolté son âme noble et pure, et l’on peut dire que s’il montrait peu de pitié pour tout ce qui était mal, il s’exaltait vivement pour tout ce qui était bien. Personne ne servait aussi chaudement ceux qui possédaient son estime ; si l’on attaquait ses amis, il les défendait avec tant d’énergie que les gens froids l’accusaient d’exagération. - 'Vous devez me juger ainsi, répondit-il une fois à un égoïste de notre connaissance ; car je prends à tout ce qui est bon, et vous ne prenez à rien.'

La société qu’il recherchait de préférence était celle des artistes et des gens de lettres les plus distingués ; il y comptait des amis, qu’il a toujours conservés, même parmi ceux dont les opinions politiques n’étaient point les siennes.

Il aimait tous les arts avec passion, et ses connaissances en peinture étaient très remarquables. Comme sa fortune lui permettait de satisfaire des goûts fort dispendieux, il avait une galerie de tableaux des plus grands maîtres de diverses écoles ; son salon était enrichi de meubles précieux et d’ornemens du meilleur goût. Il donnait fréquemment des fêtes magnifiques et qui tenaient de la féerie, au point qu’on l’appelait l’enchanteur ; mais sa plus grande jouissance pourtant était de soulager les malheureux ; aussi, combien a-t-il fait d’ingrats ! (Vigée Le Brun, Souvenirs, ouvrage cité dans la Bibliographie, vol. I, pp. 210-212.)

La vieille comtesse de Boigne le décrivait Vaudreuil comme un homme insensible et superficiel : J’ai beaucoup vu le comte de Vaudreuil à Londres, sans avoir jamais découvert la distinction dont ses contemporains lui ont fait honneur. […] Chez Mme Lebrun, il se pâmait devant un tableau et protégeait les artistes. Il vivait familièrement avec eux et gardait ses grands airs pour le salon de Mme de Polignac, et son ingratitude pour la Reine dont je l’ai entendu parler avec la dernière inconvenance. En émigration et devenu vieux, il ne lui restait plus que le ridicule de toutes ses prétentions et l’inconsidération de voir les amants de sa femme fournir à l’entretien de sa maison par des cadeaux qu’elle était censée gagner à la loterie. (Récits d’une tante : Mémoires de la comtesse de Boigne, née [Éléonore Adèle] d’Osmond, publiés par Charles Nicoullaud, 3ème éd., vol. I, Paris, Librairie Plon, 1907, pp. 144-145.)

Avant la Révolution, les dépenses de Vaudreuil excédaient de beaucoup ses énormes revenus personnels et, lorsque Calonne tomba en disgrâce en avril 1787, son crédit s’épuisa totalement. Dans la nuit du 16 au 17 juillet 1789, il quitta Paris pour la Suisse en compagnie du comte d’Artois, des Polignac et d’autres membre de leur société qu’un large secteur de la population français exécrait. Il abandonnait toutes ses possessions, y compris sa collection, dont une petite partie lui sera envoyée plus tard à Londres par l’intermédiaire de son cousin, l’aquafortiste Jean Philippe Le Gentil, comte de Paroy (1750–1824) et un confrère créole, le colonel Pierre Franc¸ois Venault de Charmilly (?–1815), qui la mettra en vente.

Vaudreuil et ses amis émigrés errèrent d’un pays à l’autre pendant toute la durée de la Révolution, du Consulat et de l’Empire napoléonien. Gabrielle de Polignac étant décédée en Autriche décembre 1793 deux mois après l’exécution de Marie Antoinette, en 1795 à Londres, il épousa une jeune parente, Victoire Joséphine Marie Hyacinthe de Rigaud de Vaudreuil, dont il eut deux fils prénommés l’un, Charles-Philippe-Joseph-Alfred (1796-1880), et l’autre Victor-Louis-Alfred (1799-1834). La mère et les deux fils furent portraiturés au pastel en 1804 par Vigée Le Brun. (Cf. Neil Jeffares, Dictionary of pastellists before 1800, édition en ligne - http://www.pastellists.com/Articles/VigeeLeBrun.pdf - pp. 15-16, nos J.76.39, J.76.391 et J.76.392 ; deux de ces pastels sont reproduits en couleurs.) Avec sa conjointe Anne-Louise Collot, Victor-Louis eut une fille, Marie-Charlotte de Rigaud de Vaudreuil (1830-1900) qui épousera le comte Gédéon de Clermont-Tonnerre. Sa vente après-décès contenait une grande partie des portraits de famille de son grand-père paternel.

Après son retour définitif à Paris de ses pérégrinations avec les Bourbons, Louis XVIII le nomma à la Chambre des pairs et à l’Institut et lui attribua le titre de gouverneur du Palais du Louvre, où il mourut le 17 janvier 1817 à l’âge de soixante-dix-sept ans. Ses restes furent ensevelis au Cimetière de Saint-Pierre-du-Calvaire dans la rue du Mont-Cenis où ils furent rejoints dans cette sépulture par ceux d’autres membres de sa famille.

Dans les listes de ses productions artistiques qui se trouvent à la fin de chacun des trois volumes de l’édition original de ses fameux Souvenirs publiés par le libraire Hippolyte Fournier entre 1835 et 1837, Louise Vigée Le Brun fait état d’un original et cinq « copies » (c’est-à-dire répliques) de son portrait de Vaudreuil sous l’année 1784 et de « deux bustes » réalisés après son retour d’émigration à Paris. (Vigée Le Brun, Souvenirs, vol. I, 1835, p. 332 et vol. III, 1837, p. 331.) Une des répétitions tardives est un ovale que représente le modèle vêtu d’un costume noir et d’un gilet jaune ; elle est conservée dans une collection privée.

Le tableau généralement considéré comme étant la première version du portrait à mi-jambes de Vaudreuil, œuvre qui descendit directement de Vaudreuil par sa petite-fille, la précitée comtesse Gédéon de Clermont-Tonnerre (elle est reproduite en héliogravure en frontispice des deux tomes de La Correspondance intime du comte de Vaudreuil et du comte d’Artois pendant l’Émigration (1789-1815) publiés en 1889 par Léonce Pingaud), se trouve au Virginia Museum of Fine Arts à Richmond. Le comte y est assis à côté d’une table de forme probablement octogonale et à pieds torsadés dont le bord est gravé en relief. (Cf. Joseph Baillio, Élisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun (1755-1842), Fort Worth, Kimbell Museum of Art, 1982, pp. 51-54, n° 14 ; Paris, Galeries nationales du Grand Palais, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, 23 septembre 2015-11 janvier 2016, pp. 166-167 et 350, n° 50 ; New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, 9 février-15 mai 2016 et Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada (Musée des Beaux-Arts du Canada), 10 juin-11 septembre 2016, pp. 96-97 et n° 21.)

De loin le plus bel exemplaire du portrait de Vaudreuil en buste appartient au Musée Jacquemart-André ; le modèle porte une veste de velours bleu à grand collet doublée de soie blanche, vêtement agrémenté d’un jabot de linon, d’un gilet rayé noir et ocre, et ses décorations de chevalerie comprennent sur sa poitrine un simple petit ruban rouge de l’ordre de Saint-Louis sans la croix en émail et le cordon bleu et la plaque du Saint-Esprit. Cette image, dont modelé est exquis et le rendu des traits comme les yeux, la bouche mi-ouverte et les cheveux poudrés, est d’une ressemblance tellement vivante qu’on est en droit de croire que Vigée Le Brun l’aurait faite d’après nature comme étude préparatoire qui lui permettrait d’exécuter les deux portraits où le sujet est représenté à mi-jambes. Le buste ovale exposé dans la ville de Versailles — Musée Lambinet, De la cour à la ville sous les règnes de Louis XV et Louis XVI : Cent portraits pour un siècle, 6 novembre 2019-1er mars 2020, pp. 93-95, n° 42 — manque de vivacité, et le rendu des cheveux a quelque chose de dur, voire de métallique.

Nous remercions Joseph Baillio d'avoir rédigé la notice ci-dessus.
;

More from Maîtres Anciens - Dessins, Peintures, Sculptures

View All
View All