JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)
JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)
JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)
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JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)
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Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE MANHATTAN COLLECTION
JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)

IMPORTANT 'FORME LIBRE' OR 'CACHALOT' LOW TABLE, 1966

Details
JEAN ROYÈRE (1902-1981)
Important 'Forme Libre' or 'Cachalot' Low Table, 1966
ash, satinwood, wenge, bubinga
10 x 24 1⁄2 x 58 1⁄2 in. (25.4 x 62.2 x 148.6 cm)
Literature
Décors Insolites chez Tristan de Salazar en l'Hôtel des Archevêques de Sens, du 29 Janvier au 20 Février 1966, Paris, 1966, pp. 2 and 10 (for mention of the present lot)
P.-M. G., "Les décorateurs à l'hôtel de Sens", Le Monde, Paris, 11 February 1966 (for a description of the exhibition mentioning Royère’s presentation)
P. -E. Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2002, pp. 266 (for a related example) and 291 (present lot illustrated)
J. Lacoste and P. Seguin, Jean Royère, vol. 1, Paris, 2012, p. 218 (for a related example)
P. -E. Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, pp. 278 (for a related example) andd 306 (present lot illustrated)
Exhibited
Paris, Hôtel des Archevêques de Sens (Bibliothèque Forney), 'Salon au 50ème étage d’un immeuble de Manhattan', cors insolites chez Tristan de Salazar, January – February 1966
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.
Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country. Please contact Christina Haselerhansen for more information about this lot.
Sale room notice
Please note the updated materials for this lot are ash, satinwood, wenge and bubinga.

Brought to you by

Daphné Riou
Daphné Riou Vice President, Senior Specialist, Head of Americas

Lot Essay

The present lot was prominently displayed in Jean Royère’s last show, held from January 29th to February 20th at the Hotel de Sens (Bibliothèque Forney) in Paris. The exhibition, called ‘Décors Insolites chez Tristan de Salazar’, a reference to the Archbishop who rebuilt the Hotel de Sens at the turn of the sixteenth century, brought together twelve leading interior designers of the 1960s, around the theme of wallpapers.

Designers such as Raphael, Jansen, and Royère revisited the interiors of the guard room, the oratory, and the private bedroom of Isabelle II of Spain to show the potential of both traditional and modern wall papers, which completely covered parts of certain rooms from floor to ceiling. The exhibition was a great success, attracting over 12,000 visitors in less than a month.

Titled ‘Salon au 50eme etage d’un immeuble de Manhattan a New York’, (Living room at the 50th floor of a Manhattan apartment in New York), Jean Royère’s interior was “deliberately very simple,” and featured his most iconic creations, such as a Polar Bear suite and a free-form low table. Referred to as ‘Flaque’ in the contemporary literature but also called ‘Cachalot’, this low table is positioned on a carpet that in a way that emphasizes the fluid form of the top. One of the feet is hollow, hosting a plant whose leaves echo the naturalistic inspiration of the marquetry.

In one of Paris’ oldest buildings, Royère displayed his vision of one of the most modern ways of living in the 1960s: a top floor apartment in a skyscraper in Manhattan. With its bold, comfortable shapes, new materials and bright colors, Royère’s last exhibition encapsulates his creative and novel approach to design, a free and whimsical style so representative of the joyful spirit of the mid-century.

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