A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES
A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES
A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES
A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES
3 More
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES

QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY

Details
A RARE PAIR OF CHINESE IMPERIAL CLOISONNÉ AND CHAMPLEVÉ ENAMEL LINGZHI JARDINIÈRES
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Each tall jardinière is of circular section and divided by key-fret bands into two register of cloisonné enamel panels decorated with lotus scrolls, all raised on a shaped foot ring, the opening of the jardinère is covered with crushed coral from which emerges the stem of the 'plant' which bears multi-branched lingzhi with textured gilt details.
27 in. (68 cm.) high
Provenance
Anonymous sale, Christie's Hong Kong, 28 April 1996, lot 22.
Acquired by Ann and Gordon Getty from the above.
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Sale Enquiries
Sale Enquiries The Ann & Gordon Getty Collection

Lot Essay

In the 18th century, lavish jardinières with various types of ‘plants’ were used as decorations in the imperial palace. In Tributes to Guandong to the Qing Court, Beijing, 1987, p. 55. Yang Boda discusses the diversity of such ‘potted landscapes’ or ‘potted flowers’ and notes that all media could be employed, organic and inorganic, to recreate these miniature plants and rockeries 'for the viewing enjoyment of the Emperor and his concubines within the living halls of the palace complex'. The choice of subject usually carried some kind of auspicious meaning. The lingzhi (Ganoderma lucidum) is a woody fungus that was attributed with many medicinal qualities and was an ingredient in certain potions of immortality. As seen here, the lingzhi is a wish-fulfilling symbol as well as an emblem of longevity.
A very similar pair of cloisonné and champlevé enamel lingzhi jardinières was sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 29 November 2005, lot 1586, while similar stems of champlevé enamel gilt-bronze lingzhi can be seen ‘growing’ from a pair of painted glass-inset octagonal jardinières sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 7 July 2003, lot 593.
A small lingzhi motif can be seen issuing from a gilt-bronze and enameled gu-form vase in the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in Zhongguo Meishu Quanji, vol. 10, Beijing, 1996, p. 195, no. 348. Another gilt-bronze gu-form vase inlaid with jade and turquoise from the National Palace Museum, Taipei, includes a hardstone-inlaid lingzhi branch and is illustrated in The Special Exhibition of Incense Burners and Perfumers Throughout the Dynasties, Taipei, 1994, p. 250, no. 104.
;

More from The Ann & Gordon Getty Collection: Volume 1 | Important Pictures and Decorative Arts, Evening Sale

View All
View All