A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL
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A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL
4 More
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTION
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL

IRAN, 18TH CENTURY

Details
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD PANEL
IRAN, 18TH CENTURY
The sky-blue silk satin field embroidered with couched metal-thread and silk with a central stylised flowerhead surrounded by floral vine, within magenta silk borders similarly embroidered with floral vine, mounted behind clear acrylic, overall excellent condition
29 3⁄8 x 30 3⁄8in. (74.5 x 77.2cm.)
Provenance
Jules Richard (1816-1891)
Frederick Du Cane Godman (1834-1919)
By descent to Edith Godman, sold
South Lodge House sale, Christie's, 16-17 July 1984, lot 809
Exhibited
International Exhibition of Persian Art, Burlington House, 1931, ref.G13/275H
Further details
Some countries prohibit or restrict the purchase and/or import of Iranian-origin property. Bidders must familiarise themselves with any laws or shipping restrictions that apply to them before bidding on these lots. For example, the USA prohibits dealings in and import of Iranian-origin “works of conventional craftsmanship” (such as carpets, textiles, decorative objects, and scientific instruments) without an appropriate licence. Christie’s has a general OFAC licence which, subject to compliance with certain conditions, would enable a buyer to import this type of lot into the USA. If you intend to use Christie’s licence, please contact us for further information before you bid.

Brought to you by

Emilie Frontera
Emilie Frontera Senior Sale Coordinator

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Lot Essay


This finely worked embroidery uses the technique of couching, where vast quantities of metal-thread, often silver or silver-gilt, were held down by regular silk threads to create patterns. Such textiles would be used commonly as wrappings around treasured objects where the rich embroidery would reflect the valued item within (Jennifer Wearden and Patricia Baker (eds.), Iranian Textiles, London, 2010, p.62). The present lot is a particularly successful example using two colours of silk further highlighted by a multitude of patterns within the couched thread.

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