A SILK AND METAL-THREAD SASH WITH COMPOSITE BORDERS
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD SASH WITH COMPOSITE BORDERS
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD SASH WITH COMPOSITE BORDERS
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PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTION
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD SASH WITH COMPOSITE BORDERS

THE CENTRAL FIELD IRAN, LATE 17TH CENTURY

Details
A SILK AND METAL-THREAD SASH WITH COMPOSITE BORDERS
THE CENTRAL FIELD IRAN, LATE 17TH CENTURY
The central field with bands of gold rosettes against a red or blue ground alternating with undulating bands of flowers and leaves against a gold ground, between a floral border ribbon, the borders composed of composite Mughal, Ottoman and Chinese silk fragments, fringed with multicoloured tassels, mounted on a fabric backing with label affixed to the back
Sash 8ft.7in. x 29 1/8in. (262.9 x 74cm.)
Provenance
Gifted by the King of Derge, Tibet, to Jamgon Ngawang Gyeltsen (d. 1732) during his embassy to Derge between 1688 and 1695 and left by Jamgon Ngawang Gyeltsen to the monks of the Lhundrubteng Monastry, Tibet, by 1695 (by repute),
Acquired from Spink & Son, 1987
Further details
Some countries prohibit or restrict the purchase and/or import of Iranian-origin property. Bidders must familiarise themselves with any laws or shipping restrictions that apply to them before bidding on these lots. For example, the USA prohibits dealings in and import of Iranian-origin “works of conventional craftsmanship” (such as carpets, textiles, decorative objects, and scientific instruments) without an appropriate licence. Christie’s has a general OFAC licence which, subject to compliance with certain conditions, would enable a buyer to import this type of lot into the USA. If you intend to use Christie’s licence, please contact us for further information before you bid.

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Emilie Frontera
Emilie Frontera Senior Sale Coordinator

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Lot Essay


The label accompanying this sash indicates that it was gifted to the Buddhist monk Jamgon Ngawang Gyeltsen (1647-1732). Born in Bhutan, Jamgon Ngawang Gyeltsen was sent as an ambassador to Sanggye Tenpa, the King of Derge in 1688 where he resided at the Lhundrubteng Monastry until 1695. During his time at the monastery he was a trusted advisor to the King, settling controversies and giving instruction. As he did not want to own any material goods, Gyeltsen left all his possessions to the monks of Lhundrnbteng when he returned to Bhutan, which would have included this sash.

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