ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)
ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)
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ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)

Mao: One Print

Details
ANDY WARHOL (1928-1987)
Mao: One Print
screenprint in colors, on Beckett High White paper, 1972, signed in ball-point pen on the reverse, numbered 'a.p. 5⁄50' (an artist's proof, the edition was 250), co-published by Castelli Graphics and Multiples, Inc., New York, with the artist's copyright inkstamp on the reverse, the full sheet, in very good condition, framed
Sheet: 36 x 36 in. (914 x 914 mm.)
Literature
Feldman & Schellmann II.99

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Lindsay Griffith
Lindsay Griffith Head of Department

Lot Essay

Warhol embraced capitalist and mass consumer-culture, systems harshly opposed by the Chinese Communist Party and their Chairman, Mao Zedong (1893-1976). The Chairman's propaganda slogans and images, likewise, were mass-produced and disseminated throughout China. It was this parallel between political propaganda and capitalist advertising which grabbed Warhol's attention. Mao became the subject of five series of paintings (199 in total), drawings, a screenprint on wallpaper and the set of ten screenprints, of which the present lot is one example from the set, alongside the Marilyn, Campbell's Soup and Electric Chairs sets.

Often, the artist was able to subtly and playfully express his dissent: he opted for a vibrant colour palette, transforming the communist leader into a Western glamourized and kitsch popstar, with eyeshadow, lipstick or blush. The overlaying lines and doodles on this print can be interpreted as the artist's assertion of artistic freedom and personal expression, which was repressed during Mao's dictatorship.

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