A FINE GEORGE II SILVER COVERED BOX FROM THE WARRINGTON PLATE
A FINE GEORGE II SILVER COVERED BOX FROM THE WARRINGTON PLATE

MARK OF JAMES SHRUDER, LONDON, 1745

Details
A FINE GEORGE II SILVER COVERED BOX FROM THE WARRINGTON PLATE
MARK OF JAMES SHRUDER, LONDON, 1745
Plain circular and on moulded rim foot, the body and detachable domed cover each engraved with a coat-of-arms, motto and supporters beneath an Earl's coronet, marked on base and cover, and engraved with scratch weights 14=10 and 6 oz=1
5 in. (12.8 cm.) diameter; 20 oz. (631 gr.)
Provenance
George, 2nd Earl of Warrington and thence by decent to Catherine, Lady Grey and Sir John Foley Grey Bart., 20 April 1921, lot 150
Furniture, Pictures and Silver from Tythrop Park, sold Christie's, London, 27 April 1995, lot 86 (part)
Literature
George, 2nd Earl of Warrington, The Particulars of my Plate and its Weight, 1754, p. 15; Boxes with lids for oatmeal 20=11
James Lomax and James Rothwell, Country House Silver from Dunham Massey, 2006, p. 103, n. 21, p. 202.

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Lot Essay

The arms are those of Booth, for George, 2nd Earl of Warrington (1675-1758).

This unusual "oatmeal" box is one of three listed in the Earl of Warrington's inventory "For the rooms" of Dunham Massey. The two other oatmeal boxes, which sold in the 1921 Foley Grey auction at Christie's, have now returned to the ancestral home of the Earl of Warrington. James Lomax and James Rothwell, in Country House Silver from Dunham Massey, note that the purpose of these boxes, as well as seven "Oatmeal plates" remains unclear. They postulate that the boxes may have held a dry oatmeal powder which was transferred to plates when prepared into a soap or lotion. While silver toilet services commonly included items for serving breakfast, these silver boxes were unlikely to have held porridge, as oats served largely as animal feed in the 18th century. These oatmeal boxes and basins, combined with other chamber silver, including hand basins, ewers, and "mouth" basins could be assembled as needed for Dunham Massey's ten principal bedrooms and dressing rooms (see Lomax and Rothwell, cat. no. 44 and 49, pp. 102-03 and 109-109 for illustrations of the two other oatmeal boxes).
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