A GERMAN ROYAL CANDLESTICK AND THREE LATER MATCHING CANDLESTICKS
A GERMAN ROYAL CANDLESTICK AND THREE LATER MATCHING CANDLESTICKS

ONE WITH MARK OF BALTHASAR FRIEDRICH BEHRENS, HANOVER, CIRCA 1735, AND THREE MODERN COPIES

Details
A GERMAN ROYAL CANDLESTICK AND THREE LATER MATCHING CANDLESTICKS
ONE WITH MARK OF BALTHASAR FRIEDRICH BEHRENS, HANOVER, CIRCA 1735, AND THREE MODERN COPIES
Each on shaped square base with baluster stem with foliage knops and spool-shaped socket, with detachable nozzle, the stem engraved with the English Royal arms within Garter motto below Royal crown, the nozzles engraved with the initials 'GR II' the English Royal crown, the German example marked underneath, with inventory number 'No. 43'; the nozzles with inventory numbers 'No. 12'; 'No. 25'; 'No. 31' and No.57'
9 1/8 in. (23 cm.) high
117 oz. 5 dwt. (3,647 gr.)
The Royal arms and initials on the German example are those of King George II of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover (r.1727-1760).
Provenance
The German example apparently part of a set of 72 candlesticks for King George II of England as Elector of Hanover (r.1727-1760) and by descent to
Ernest Augustus, 1st Duke of Cumberland and King of Hanover (r.1837-1851), fifth son of King George III of Great Britain, by descent to his grandson
The Duke of Brunswick (1845-1923).
Sold privately to the Vienna dealers Gluckselig in 1924.

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Matilda Burn
Matilda Burn

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Lot Essay

Balthazar Friedrich Behrens (1701-1760) married in 1728 the widow of the Hanover court goldsmith, Conrad Mundt. His most famous productions were the five magnificent chandeliers after designs by the English architect, William Kent that he supplied to the court at Herrenhausen, in 1736 and 1737. One of these, formerly in the collection of M. Hubert de Givenchy sold Christie's, London, 7 July 2011, lot 52.

Much of the Hanover Royal plate, including no doubt the present candlestick, remained at Herrenhausen until shortly after the Seven Weeks war in 1866. During the war the Palace was sacked by Prussian troops but the Royal Plate survived being locked away in a vault hidden by lime and debris. George Frederick, King of Hanover was deposed during that war and the family was deprived of the title of Kings and were, henceforth, styled Dukes of Brunswick. They settled in Austria and their silver was moved to Penzing near Vienna and the Duke's villa at Gmunden. Following the death of George Frederick's son, Ernest Augustus in 1923 a considerable part of the Hanover silver, both German and English, was purchased by the Viennese dealer Gluckselig and it appears to have been, at least in part, resold to London dealers Crichton brothers.
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