A PAIR OF FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT POT-A-CREME FROM THE MADAME MERE SERVICE
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 2… Read more PROPERTY FROM A SWISS PRIVATE COLLECTION (LOTS 255-263)
A PAIR OF FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT POT-A-CREME FROM THE MADAME MERE SERVICE

MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1798-1809

Details
A PAIR OF FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT POT-A-CREME FROM THE MADAME MERE SERVICE
MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1798-1809
Each vase-shaped and on spreading foot, the lower body chased with foliage, with bull's-mask handles, the detachable cover with foliage finial, the body applied twice and the cover applied once with the French Imperial arms above the initial 'M', each marked underneath, near rim and inside cover, each further struck on the foot, cover and near rim with later French tax mark
3½ in. (9 cm.) high
16 oz. 12 dwt. (423 gr.)
The arms are those of Maria Letizia Ramolino, known as Madame Mére (1750-1836). (2)
Provenance
Maria Letizia Ramolino, known as Madame Mére (1750-1836), mother of Emperor Napoleon.
Probably Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 9 May 1968, lot 60.
Literature
Probably V. Brett, The Sotheby's Directory of Silver 1600-1940, London, 1986, p. 376-377, no. 1,792.
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

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Lot Essay

Madame Mére

Maria Letizia Ramolino, later styled Madame Mére, was born in Corsica in 1750 and married Carlo Maria Bonaparte at the age of 14. During the troubles in Corsica, the Bonapartes eventually sided with the French and, following the death of her husband, she moved to France in 1793. With the rise to power of her son Napoleon, she demanded, and received, imperial accord, being eventually styled 'Son Altesse Impèriale, Madame Mére de l'Empereur'. Settled in l'hôtel de Brienne, Madame Mére accrued immense riches, to the mild disapproval of the Emperor. Upon his downfall in 1814, she too moved to Elba and is said to have financed him during his stay there. However, upon his abdication following Waterloo, Madame Mére moved to Rome where she remained until her death in 1836. The archives of Maison Odiot indicate that the service was delivered on 11 November 1806. Other pieces from the service from the Al-Tajir Collection are illustrated in The Glory of the Goldsmith, pages 30 and 31.

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