AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)
AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)
AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)
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AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more
AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)

A life-size figure of Pauline Borghese as Venus Victrix

Details
AFTER ANTONIO CANOVA (ITALIAN, 1757-1822)
A life-size figure of Pauline Borghese as Venus Victrix
unsigned, on a modern panelled white marble plinth
Carrara marble
The statue:
39 in. (99 cm.) high; 78 in. (198 cm.) wide; 26 in. (66 cm.) deep
The plinth:
29 ¾ in. (76 cm.) high; 87 ¾ in. (223 cm.) wide; 33 in. (84 cm.) deep
(2)Circa 1900.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

Brought to you by

Adam Kulewicz
Adam Kulewicz

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Lot Essay

The present marble is based on the celebrated sculpture (dated circa 1805-1808) by Antonio Canova of Pauline Borghese, sister of Napoleon Bonaparte and wife of Prince Camillo Borghese, which is today in the Villa Borghese in Rome. Canova was renowned for his neo-classical sculpture which skilfully intertwined Antique influences with modern artistic ideals, in this case representing the famed Roman Princess in the guise of Venus Victrix clutching an apple in her hand after being declared the winner of the infamous Judgment of Paris. Like many famous models of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it was reproduced with some frequency at the turn of the 20th century to meet a burgeoning European and American demand for reproductions of famed Roman sculptures. Of nearly identical size to the original, this rare marble would have appealed to a wealthy grand tourist who had admired Canova’s masterpiece during a visit to the Eternal City.

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