Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)
Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)
Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)
Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF ARTHUR M. ODUM
Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)

Portrait of a woman

Details
Anatoly Zverev (1931-1986)
Portrait of a woman
signed with initials and dated ‘AZ 65’ (lower left)
oil on paper
24¼ x 24 in. (61.6 x 61 cm.)
Painted in 1965
and three other works on paper by the same artist
Provenance
Acquired from the artist by Arthur M. Odum (1936-2017) and Marillyn K. “Bitsy” Odum (1938-2011) in Moscow between 1967-1969.
Literature
Exhibition catalogue, Russian Paintings of the 1960s: Unofficial Soviet Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Odum, Odessa, Texas, 1990, listed no. 5, illustrated p. [8].
Exhibited
Odessa, Ellen Noël Art Museum, Russian Paintings of the 1960s: Unofficial Soviet Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Odum, February-March, 1990, no 5.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Alexis de Tiesenhausen

Lot Essay

At the height of the Cold War, Arthur M. Odum served as a member of the United States Foreign Service in the Soviet Union. Recognised for his skillful diplomacy and for his achievements in administering highly classified intelligence, Odum worked as an intelligence liaison between various government agencies.
In 1967 Odum was posted, together with his wife Dr. Marillyn K. ‘Bitsy” Odum (1938-2011) and their two sons John Arthur Odum and Christopher Digges Odum, to Moscow. During this period Odum was introduced to the group of dissident artists living and working in defiance of the regime. Odum was impressed by these artists who, in his words, “collectively and individually spoke out through their art against the brutal Soviet Communist repression of individual liberty and freedom of expression. In this collection of “unofficial”, or protest art, are religious themes, political criticism, and complaint about the economy and the dismal state of Soviet agriculture and the poor quality of food available in the marketplace. Other paintings are simply compositions of individual artistic expression of beauty, form, col or and theme.” (A. Odum, Unofficial Russian Paintings of the 1960s from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Odum, 1990, p. [2]). Odum acquired the paintings personally between the years 1967-1969 while serving as a diplomat with the United States Embassy in Moscow, which he recalled as a vivid memory during this period.

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