Overview

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Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927)
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE CALIFORNIA COLLECTION 
Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927)

Le Brusc, matin de Mistral

Details
Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927)
Le Brusc, matin de Mistral
signed 'Guillaumin' (lower left); dated and titled 'février 1911 le Brusc mistral matin' (on the reverse)
oil on canvas
28¾ x 36¼ in. (73 x 92.1 cm.)
Painted in February 1911
Provenance
Anon. sale, Sotheby's, London, 30 November 1988, lot 160.
Private collection, France; sale, Christie's, London, 28 June 1994, lot 154.
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.
Exhibited
Paris, Galerie Barbizon, Exposition Guillaumin, March 1964.

Brought to you by

David Kleiweg de Zwaan
David Kleiweg de Zwaan

Lot Essay

The Comité Guillaumin will include this work in their forthcoming second volume of the Guillaumin catalogue raisonné.

Painting alongside Paul Cézanne, Camille Pissarro, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir among others, Guillaumin was at the forefront of the Impressionist movement. Guillaumin's path as an artist was far from ordinary. His interest began at a young age while living in Moulins, but from the time he moved to Paris in 1857 until 1891, he always had to put work before painting in order to have enough money to live. His jobs ranged from being a clerk in his uncle's lingerie shop to working for the Paris-Orléans railroad to taking the evening shifts digging for the Highway Department. Despite the hard work, he managed to paint throughout and exhibited at the Salon des Refusés in 1863, along with a group of artists soon to be dubbed the "Impressionists" and participated in six of the eight Impressionist group shows. Indeed, Guillaumin was a close friend from the beginning of his career of both Cézanne, whom he met at the Académie Suisse, and Pissarro, whom he met soon after.

By 1887 his finances improved somewhat allowing him the freedom to travel in the south of France, painting at Agay and along the Côte d'Azur where he experimented with light and color. In 1911, he spent the spring in Le Brusc, where this painting was executed. The landscape here was harsher than Agay or Le Trayas, and his focus was on the stone pines and the sea. The present painting is an excellent example of the harsh landscape which Guillaumin infused with light and color, as we see the reds dappled through the trees and the deep purple tones in the shadows on the cliff side, set against a background of the brilliant blue-green sea, while the textures of the varied brush strokes evoke the stark environment itself.

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