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ETIENNE DRIAN (1890-1965)
PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR
ETIENNE DRIAN (1890-1965)

AN EIGHT-PANEL VERRE EGLOMISÉ MIRRORED AND PAINTED METAL SCREEN, CIRCA 1930

Details
ETIENNE DRIAN (1890-1965)
An Eight-Panel Verre Eglomisé Mirrored and Painted Metal Screen, circa 1930
each panel: 97½ in. (247.6 cm.) high, 24½ in. (62.3 cm.) wide
one panel signed Drian
Provenance
Mr. and Mrs. Bradford Norman, New York.
John Moore, New York.
Christopher Chodoff, New York.
Literature
'Grace Note,' Arts & Decoration, vol. 39, May 1933, pp. 34-36. 'Designers' Taste Shows in Their Apartments: Dresses Heed Decor,' Life, 24 May 1963, p. 52.
J. Loring, 'Reprise: A Nostalgia for Paris,' Architectural Digest, May/June 1977, pp. 108-113.
M.H. Adams, 'Great Houses of New York: River House, The Best Address, Part II,' The Huffington Post, 22 October 2009, www.huffingtonpost.com.

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Lot Essay

Etienne Drian was an artist and fashion illustrator active in France during the 1920s and '30s. The elongated forms of his chic female figures perfectly exemplified the sophisticated and refined fashions of the era and could be found in magazines such as the Gazette du Bon Temps.

Paris in the 1920s was fascinated with jazz music, which was seen as a new and distinctly American form of music. Drian's striking mirrored screen represents five jazz musicians exuberantly playing their instruments. Included in the band is the famous drummer Buddy Gilmore, who played in La Revue Négre in Paris and other popular venues of the time. The figure of Gilmore is copied from a work by photographer Berenice Abbott, who did a series of portraits of artists in Paris in the 1920s.

Another screen of this design was executed for the music room of the famed palace of the Maharaja of Indore. The present example is likely from the New York apartment of Mr. and Mrs. Bradford Norman, Jr., who decorated their home with zebra-upholstered furniture and two grand pianos for impromptu concerts. In 1963, the screen was featured in the home of fashion designer John Moore in a layout in Life magazine. By the 1970s, the screen had moved to the New York apartment of antiques dealer Christopher Chodoff, where it was published in a 1977 Architectural Digest article.

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