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Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874-1939)
Property of an Estate
Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874-1939)

In the Boudoir

Details
Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874-1939)
In the Boudoir
signed 'F.C. Frieseke.' (lower left)
oil on canvas
25½ x 31¾ in. (64.7 x 80.6 cm.)
Painted circa 1914.
Provenance
Private collection, London, until 1969.
Private collection, New York, acquired from the above.
Private collection, Dallas, Texas, circa 1977.
Private collection, California.
[With]Schweitzer Gallery, New York.
[With]Vance Jordan Fine Art, Inc., New York.
Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1998.
Literature
Salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Catalogue Illustré du Salon de 1914, exhibition catalogue, Paris, 1914, p. 102, no. 448, illustrated (as Dans le boudoir).
I.S. Fort, M. Quick, American Art: A Catalogue of the Los Angeles Museum of Art Collection, Los Angeles, California, 1991, pp. 253-54 (as Mrs. Frederick Carl Frieseke).
N. Kilmer, L. McWhorter, Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an Impressionist, exhibition catalogue, Savannah, Georgia, 2001, p. 169, pl. 45, illustrated.
Exhibited
Edinburgh, Scotland, Royal Scottish Academy of the Arts, 1914.
Paris, Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Twenty-fourth Salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 1914 (as Dans le boudoir).
Paris, France, Musée du Luxembourg, 1920.
Coral Gables, Florida, University of Miami, Lowe Art Museum, French Impressionists Influence American Artists, March 19-April 25, 1971, no. 36.
Savannah, Georgia, Telfair Museum of Art, Frederick Carl Frieseke: The Evolution of an American Impressionist, March 20-June 3, 2001, no. 45.

Lot Essay

In the Boudoir relates to a much larger work of the same title by Frederick Frieseke in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California. In Ilene S. Fort's and Michael Quick's catalogue of the museum's collection, they discuss both paintings, "In the Boudoir [1914, Los Angeles County Museum of Art] is typical of the many informal interior scenes Frieseke painted throughout his career. Although he much preferred to paint outdoors, the American public of the 1910s more readily bought his boudoir scenes of women involved in their toilette or in some other feminine activity...In this painting, as in many of Frieseke's interiors of the 1910s, the model [Jeanne Savoy] lounges in a room decorated with elegant French rococo furniture and an oriental carpet. In contrast to the figure's restful pose, the scene is alive with decorative patterning. Frieseke's interior is similar to those of Edouard Vuillard (1868-1940). Both artists often presented their figures in corners of rooms, viewing them diagonally and from a slightly elevated viewpoint. The floor tilts up, flattening the space of the room and thereby emphasizing the painting as an arrangement of flat shapes and patterns...There exists a smaller almost exact version of In the Boudoir painted in a stronger palette. Frieseke occasionally painted smaller versions of completed paintings he admired." (American Art: A Catalogue of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Collection, Los Angeles, California, 1991, p. 253).


This painting will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of Frieseke's work being compiled by Nicholas Kilmer, the artist's grandson, and sponsored by Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York.

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