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Hayv Kahraman (Iraqi, b. 1981)
Lots are subject to 5% import Duty on the importat… Read more PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION 
Hayv Kahraman (Iraqi, b. 1981)

The Collective Cut

Details
Hayv Kahraman (Iraqi, b. 1981)
The Collective Cut
signed with the artist's monogram (upper right)
oil on linen
42 x 68 1/8in. (106.5 x 173cm.)
Painted in 2008
Provenance
Thierry Goldberg Gallery, New York.
Acquired from the above by the present owner.
Literature
H. Amirsadeghi (ed.), New Vision: Arab Contemporary Art in the 21st Century, London 2009 (illustrated in colour, p. 178).
Exhibited
New York, Thierry Goldberg Gallery, I-Ling Eleen Lin & Hayv Kahraman, 2008.
London, Saatchi Gallery, Unveiled: New Art from the Middle East, Saatchi Gallery, 2009 (illustrated in colour, p. 68).
Lille, Tri Postal, The Silk Road, 2010-2011 (illustrated in colour, p. 84).
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Lots are subject to 5% import Duty on the importation value (low estimate) levied at the time of collection shipment within UAE. For UAE buyers, please note that duty is paid at origin (Dubai) and not in the importing country. As such, duty paid in Dubai is treated as final duty payment. It is the buyer's responsibility to ascertain and pay all taxes due.

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Lot Essay

Spanning drawing, painting, and sculpture, Hayv Kahraman's practice engages with very difficult issues surrounding female identity in her homeland - how women are victimised within their own culture, made subservient to men and often suffer the most from the effects of the war. Kahraman tells these tales of horror with a demure grace through her stunningly beautiful paintings. In this series of work, her images depict the scriptural story of the Sacrifice of The Lamb, which is central to the Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha, recasting the figures as women.

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