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Jake and Dinos Chapman (b. 1966 & b. 1962)
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Jake and Dinos Chapman (b. 1966 & b. 1962)

Tragic Anatomies (i) Satyr (ii) Fuck Face (iii) Untitled #2 (iv) Catherine Milner (v) Bog Standard Two Faced Cunt (vi) Def Cunt (vii) Mirror, Mirror on the Floor Your Dad's a Prick Your Mom's a Whore (viii) Sad Doggy (ix) Doggy (x) Chocolate Cha Cha (xi) Cunt Chops (xii) Forehead

Details
Jake and Dinos Chapman (b. 1966 & b. 1962)
Tragic Anatomies
(i) Satyr
(ii) Fuck Face
(iii) Untitled #2
(iv) Catherine Milner
(v) Bog Standard Two Faced Cunt
(vi) Def Cunt
(vii) Mirror, Mirror on the Floor Your Dad's a Prick Your Mom's a Whore (viii) Sad Doggy
(ix) Doggy
(x) Chocolate Cha Cha
(xi) Cunt Chops
(xii) Forehead
fibreglass, resin and paint, in twleve parts and plastic foliage
installation dimensions variable
figure dimensions:
(i) 54 3/8 x 20½ x 26 3/8in. (138 x 52 x 67cm.)
(ii) 53 1/8 x 24 x 13¾in. (135 x 61 x 35cm.)
(iii) 55 1/8 x 28 3/8 x 21¾in. (140 x 72 x 55cm.)
(iv) 61 7/8 x 37 x 27 5/8in. (157 x 94 x 70cm.)
(v) 60 5/8 x 23 5/8 x 14¼in. (154 x 60 x 36cm.)
(vi) 41 x 23 5/8 x 27½in. (104 x 60 x 70cm.)
(vii) 35½ x 24½ x 35½in. (90 x 62 x 90cm.)
(viii) 37 3/8 x 37 x 37 3/8in. (95 x 94 x 95cm.)
(ix) 30 x 23 5/8 x 30¾in. (76 x 60 x 78cm.)
(x) 52 x 27½ x 29½in. (132 x 70 x 75cm.)
(xi) 29 5/8 x 23 5/8 x 17¾in. (126 x 60 x 45cm.)
(xii) 52¾ x 23¼ x 12 5/8in. (134 x 59 x 32cm.)
Executed in 1996
Provenance
Victoria Miro Gallery, London.
Acquired from the above in 1996.
Literature
R. Timms et. al. (eds.), Young British Art: The Saatchi Decade, New York 1999 (installation view illustrated in colour, pp. 340 and 341).
Saatchi Gallery (eds.), 100: The Work that Changed British Art, London 2003, no. 21 (illustrated in colour, pp. 48 and 49).
C. Grunenberg & T. Barson (eds.), Jake and Dinos Chapman: Bad Art for Bad People, exh. cat., Liverpool, Tate Liverpool, 2006 (detail illustrated in colour, p. 17).
E. Booth-Clibborn (ed.), The History of the Saatchi Gallery, London 2011 (installation view illustrated in colour, pp. 392-295).
Exhibited
London, The Institute of Contemporary Arts, Chapmanworld, 1996.
New York, Gagosian Gallery, Jake and Dinos Chapman: Six Feet Under, 1997 (installation view illustrated in colour, unpaged; details illustrated in colour, unpaged).
London, Royal Academy of Arts, Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection, 1997 (illustrated in colour, pp. 68 and 69).
Special Notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
VAT rate of 20% is payable on hammer price and buyer's premium

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Bianca Chu
Bianca Chu

Lot Essay

'We don't see them as deviants but rather as being perfectly autonomous in themselves. We present objects that couldn't have modes for reproduction'

(D. and J. Chapman, quoted in 'Revelations: A conversation between Robert Rosenblum and Dinos & Jake Chapman', Unholy Libel: Six Feet Under, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery,
London, 1997, p. 148).

'When our sculptures work they achieve the position of reducing the viewer to a state of absolute moral panic... they're completely troublesome objects'

(J. and D. Chapman, quoted in D. Fogle, 'A Scatological Aesthetic for the Tired of Seeing', in Chapmanworld, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 1996, unpaged).

Transforming the Garden of Eden into a prehistoric environment populated by frolicking child mutants in a plethora of metamorphosised states and pairings, Tragic Anatomies is part of one of the most famous series realised by the Chapman brothers. Executed in 1996, the work was featured in their first major New York exhibition, Dinos and Chake Chapman: Six Feet Under, held at Gagosian Gallery. Tragic Anatomies is amongst a handful of works that have come to define the so-called YBA movement and was shown at the notorious Sensation show at the Royal Academy in 1997. Through Tragic Anatomies, the Chapmans bring their viewer in direct contact with the possibilities engendered in contemporary scientific and biological 'advancements' by giving material form to horrific concepts. 'When our sculptures work they achieve the position of reducing the viewer to a state of absolute moral panic...they're completely troublesome objects' (J. and D. Chapman, quoted in D. Fogle, ' A Scatological Aesthetic for the Tired of Seeing', in Chapmanworld, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 1996, unpaged).

Founded on more than just an overriding desire to provoke shock, the Anatomies series challenges notions surrounding the homogeneity of the body in an age where plastic surgery, genetic manipulation and cloning proliferate. Here, the artists present the viewer with a group of mannequin-like children in various stations of mutation with overtly presented and repositioned sexual organs. As explained by the artists, 'the imagery originates from mannequins rather than dolls. Both dolls and mannequins are nearly human - they are approximations. We are interested in them because they preexist' (D. and J. Chapman, quoted in 'Revelations: A conversation between Robert Rosenblum and Dinos & Jake Chapman', Unholy Libel: Six Feet Under, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, London, 1997, p. 148). Deliberately playing with our biological response to identify with that which appears most closely related to us, with their smooth skin-like surfaces, the artists bring us closer to identifying them as 'real' while simultaneously deterring us from identifying them as 'human' through their implausible mutations. While drawing affinities with Hans Bellmer' s dolls, the artists' objects are not a simple amalgamation of suggestive body parts which recall the human body, they are more fully formed, disconcertingly biologically logical in their bizarre conjoinings. Cast in shapes reminiscent of mythical creatures and freak show Siamese twins, the artists engage us in an age-old dialogue about whether or not one's physical form is really an indicator of the moral decrepitude. Of their figures, the artists have said, 'we don't see them as deviants but rather as being perfectly autonomous in themselves. We present objects that couldn't have a modes for reproduction' (D. and J. Chapman, quoted in 'Revelations: A conversation between Robert Rosenblum and Dinos & JakeChapman', Unholy Libel: Six Feet Under, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, London, 1997, p. 148).

With their hybrid figures responding to contemporary debates surrounding the limits of medical progress tested by cloning, genetic manipulations and biotechnology, the artists' Anatomies series addresses complex themes at the very heart of human experience and moral behavior. 'We were interested in the convergence between filth and science' the artists explain, 'here are certain forms of idealism that we are interested in dragging down, or, at least problematizing. As far as being brothers, we are interested in the idea of origins, of our genetic origin and the etymological process of tracing down ideas in general. Our work always poses the problem of self-generation - of how something reproduces or represents itself. We like the relationship between representation and reproduction. The work instigates a sequence of impossibilities, objects that have reproductive organs but not the possibility of reproduction, neither the possibility of birth nor procreation' (D. and J. Chapman, quoted in 'Revelations: A conversation between Robert Rosenblum and Dinos & Jake Chapman', Unholy Libel: Six Feet Under, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, London, 1997, p. 147).

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