John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836-1893)
These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more
John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836-1893)

The Gossips, Bonchurch, Isle of Wight

Details
John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836-1893)
The Gossips, Bonchurch, Isle of Wight
signed and dated 'Atkinson Grimshaw 1880+' (lower right) and further signed and inscribed '"The gossips"/Atkinson Grimshaw/ 1880+' (on the reverse)
oil on board
18 x 13 in. (46 x 33 cm.)
Provenance
with Richard Green, London.
Private Swiss Collection.
Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 8 June 2006, lot 201, where purchased by the present owner.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.

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Brandon Lindberg

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Lot Essay

Still recognisable today, this view depicts Bonchurch Village Road, next to Bonchurch Pond, on the Isle of Wight. Light comes from various sources: appearing through a break in the cloud, the moon stands directly above the gossips of the title. They approach the glow of the gas lamp, while in the distance light also shines from an uncurtained window. The moonlight is reflected not only in the water to the left, but also in the muddy puddles in the foreground. Bare trees promote a dramatic interplay of shadows from these different light sources, while the colouring is distinctively Grimshaw's own.

Grimshaw may have been drawn to the Isle of Wight, as his hero, the poet, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, lived at Freshwater. He tried to resonate the mood evoked in Tennyson's poetry in his moonlit scenes, and such was his admiration for the poet that he named each of his children after characters in Idylls of the King.

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