John Ferneley, Sen. (Thrussington, Leicestershire 1782-1860 Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire)
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 2… Read more
John Ferneley, Sen. (Thrussington, Leicestershire 1782-1860 Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire)

Sir Harry Goodrich's bay hunter Smasher and groom in Ribston Park

Details
John Ferneley, Sen. (Thrussington, Leicestershire 1782-1860 Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire)
Sir Harry Goodrich's bay hunter Smasher and groom in Ribston Park
signed, inscribed and dated 'J. Ferneley Melton Mowbray 1828' (lower right)
oil on canvas
34 x 42 in. (87 x 107.3 cm.)
Provenance
Thomas Grosvenor, 2nd Earl of Wilton (1799-1882), and by descent to
Robert Grosvenor, 1st Baron Ebury (1801-1893); his sale, Christie's, London, 16 June 1894, lot 93 (20 gns. to Philpot).
with Richard Green, London, 1978.
Lt. Col. John Metcalfe Wood, until 2004.
with Richard Green, London, 2004, where purchased by the present owner.
Literature
Major Guy Paget, The Melton Mowbray of John Ferneley, 1931, p. 137, no. 289.
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

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Harriet West
Harriet West

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Lot Essay

Sir Harry Goodricke, 7th Bt. (1797-1833) inherited as a child various estates at Ribston near Knaresborough, Yorkshire; Ravensdale and Clermont in Co. Louth, Ireland and Clermont Lodge in Norfolk. He was Master of the Quorn from 1831 to 1833, spending £6,000 a year on fifty hunters and a hundred couple of hounds. His tenure attracted some of society's most illustrious sportsmen including his friend, the famous horseman Lord Plymouth, Lord Wilton (who subsequently owned this picture) and Lords Rokeby and Alvanley. According to journals of the time, he was known for his liberality and kindly manner as well as a fondness for practical jokes but this was secondary to his superb skills as a horseman.

Sir Harry Goodricke died suddenly of pneumonia, aged thirty-six, while otter hunting in Ireland. He was the last male heir of his line and so he left all his estates, horses, hounds and chattels to his lifelong friend Francis Holyoake, who took the name Holyoake Goodricke and also took over as Master of the Quorn from 1833 to 1835.

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