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Marten van Cleve (Antwerp 1524-1581)
Marten van Cleve (Antwerp 1524-1581)
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These lots have been imported from outside the EU … Read more
Marten van Cleve (Antwerp 1524-1581)

Visit to the Tenants

Details
Marten van Cleve (Antwerp 1524-1581)
Visit to the Tenants
oil on panel
27 x 57 in. (68.6 x 144.8 cm.)
Literature
K. Ertz and C. Nitze-Ertz, Marten van Cleve, Lingen, 2014, p. 188, no. 115, illustrated.
Special notice

These lots have been imported from outside the EU or, if the UK has withdrawn from the EU without an agreed transition deal, from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.
Sale room notice
Please note this lot is signed with initials 'MvC' (centre left on the butter churn dasher)

Brought to you by

Henry Pettifer
Henry Pettifer

Lot Essay

Described by Klaus Ertz as ‘eine qualitavolle Arbeit von Maeten van Cleve’, this panel is an excellent example of one of Marten van Cleve’s most popular early compositions. The subject ultimately derives from a lost painting by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, known through copies by his sons Pieter Brueghel the Younger (Florence, Museo Stibbert) and Jan Breughel the Elder (fig. 1; Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum). While interpretation of this Brueghelian subject has varied, the most convincing explanation is that it represents a wealthy bourgeois couple visiting the country home of their child’s wet-nurse, shown in the centre of this painting. Van Cleve painted more than twenty versions of his own, unique interpretation of the scene (see K. Ertz, Marten van Cleve 1524-1581: Kritischer katalog der Gemälde und Zeichnungen, Lingen, 2014, pp. 185-9, nos. 107-119), each varying considerably in size, details and figure arrangements. In a number of these treatments van Cleve extended his composition to the left to include a group of drinkers at a table, while in this case he introduces a view into a landscape through an open door. Faggin noted that van Cleve’s various depictions of the this subject date to relatively early in the painter’s career, circa 1550-60, revealing stylistic affinities with the work of van Cleve’s master, Frans Floris (‘De genre-schilder Marten van Cleef’, Oud Holland, LXXX, no. 1, 1965, p. 34).

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