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MARY CASSATT (1844-1926)
MARY CASSATT (1844-1926)
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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DIANA METCALF STAINOW
MARY CASSATT (1844-1926)

Woman Bathing (La Toilette)

Details
MARY CASSATT (1844-1926)
Woman Bathing (La Toilette)
drypoint with etching and aquatint in colors, inked à la poupée, on laid paper, circa 1891, Breeskin's fifth (final) state, Shapiro's fourth (final) state, signed in pencil, with full margins, framed
Image: 14 ¼ x 10 3/8 in. (362 x 264 mm.)
Sheet: 18 7/8 x 12 in. (479 x 305 mm.)
Literature
Breeskin 148; Matthews & Shapiro 10

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Lindsay Griffith
Lindsay Griffith Head of Department

Lot Essay

Diana Metcalf Stainow (1926-2019) was born and raised in Boston and after her marriage to Gregory Stainow, who she met in New York, she moved to France, eventually splitting her time between Paris and London. She was a painter with an eye for color and pattern and a profound interest in non-western cultures. Her taste was grounded in her family American cultural heritage. She was a descendant of Robert Treat Paine, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and a founding member of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. Her grandfather, Robert Treat Paine II, was a renowned Boston collector who gifted many masterpieces to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Her father, Thomas Metcalf, was one of the founders of the Boston Institute of Contemporary art, formerly called then the Boston Museum of Modern Art.

During World War II, the Institute became the home of the Metcalf family who occupied the two top floors of the building; the distinction between private and public space was blurred as local artists, members of the Institute, were welcome in the Metcalf household. During these formative artistic years for Diana – who attended the Boston Museum School –
the Institute had an exhibition program striking for its diversity, inclusiveness and daring representation of the vitality of American art during the 1940’s in addition to its contemporary European programming. This period was decisive in shaping her approach to collecting which ranged across centuries, cultures and styles. In the 40’s The Institute had a first solo show of Georges Rouault and exhibited works by Leger and Maillol – all artists in her collection that are now being sold. Stainow’s idiosyncratic approach was also evident in her elegant apartment in London. With her unique and daring eye she commissioned a graffiti artist to paint the entrance foyer and hung Rouault tapestries and Toulouse-Lautrec Elle prints over the graffiti to striking effect.

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