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Maud Earl (1863-1943)
Maud Earl (1863-1943)

The lost scent

Details
Maud Earl (1863-1943)
The lost scent
signed 'Maud Earl' (lower right)
oil on canvas
34 x 53 in. (86.3 x 134.6 cm.)

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Lot Essay

Perhaps more than any other artist born in the nineteenth century, Maud Earl was the pre-eminent painter of purebred dogs. She was born into an artistic family, the only daughter by the artist George Earl's first wife, Alice Beaumont Rawlins. Her uncle, Thomas Earl, was also a talented painter of horses and other animals. Maud was taught by her father and at the Royal Female School of Art, where she quickly developed her natural talent for capturing the true character of her canine subjects.

Earl exhibited regularly in England and Europe, and was a prolific and much sought after artist who painted many of the important dogs of the day, including those belonging to the Royal Family and important dog fanciers. She attributed much of her talent to her natural affinity for her subject, 'You can't paint dogs unless you understand them; I don't mean merely from the fancier's point of view. You must know whether they are happy and comfortable, and if not, why not. You must know how to quiet them when they become excited and nervous. You must know all their little likes and dislikes, and this knowledge comes from long experience' (The Young Woman, November, 1898). The artist's works were immensely popular with the public and by 1916 she had received international recognition with several solo exhibitions.
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