MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)
MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)
MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)
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MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)

XXIV Emblemata

Details
MAURITS CORNELIS ESCHER (1898-1972)
XXIV Emblemata
booklet comprising 22 woodcuts, 1931-32, on Van Gelder simili-Japan paper, with text by A. E. Drijfhout, lacking the second title page and plates XI and XII, each signed with initials in pencil, the first title-page printed on the cover, with signed contents page, the justification stamp numbered 12, one of 25 copies with the plates signed, the remainder of the edition of three hundred was unsigned, published by C.A.J. van Dishoeck, Bussum, the full sheets, with time staining, unbound but with binding holes at left, generally in good, original condition
232 x 200 x 7 mm. (overall)
Literature
Bool 159, 161-171, 174-187
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Charlie Scott
Charlie Scott

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Lot Essay

The idea of a book of emblemata was suggested to Escher by the Dutch art historian G. J. Hoogewerff, director of the Dutch Historical Institute in Rome. An emblem is an allegorical illustration that combines an image with text in the form of a saying or poem. As an artistic idiom it reached its zenith in the 18th century, when numerous books were published, often with a didactic imperative. Hoogewerff himself composed the aphorisms, under the pseudonym A. E. Drijfhout, for Escher's modern version. While Escher makes a nod to the past by including traditional motifs such as the lute, his emblemata include references drawn from everyday life, such as a vase of flowers, a kite and steam roller, as well as exquisitely rendered scenes of the natural world. Although the project was not met with initial success, it did lead to Hoogewerff writing an ground-breaking article on Escher as a graphic artist for the journal Elsevier, which was published in 1931. Hoogewerff's effuse praise for the artist would make a significant contribution to Escher's reputation.

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