NNENNA OKORE (B. 1975)
NNENNA OKORE (B. 1975)
NNENNA OKORE (B. 1975)
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This lot will be removed to our storage facility a… Read more
NNENNA OKORE (B. 1975)

Lace

Details
NNENNA OKORE (B. 1975)
Lace
clay and rope
77 5/8 x 49 5/8 x 2 3/4in. (197.2 x 126 x 7cm.)
Executed in 2007
Provenance
Contemporary African Art Gallery, New York.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2008.
Exhibited
New York, Contemporary African Art Gallery, Nnenna Okore, 2007.
Special notice

This lot will be removed to our storage facility at Momart. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. Our removal and storage of the lot is subject to the terms and conditions of storage which can be found at Christies.com/storage and our fees for storage are set out in the table below - these will apply whether the lot remains with Christie’s or is removed elsewhere. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Momart. All collections from Momart will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s it will be available for collection on any working day 9.00 am to 5.00 pm. Lots are not available for collection at weekends.

Brought to you by

Isabel Millar
Isabel Millar Specialist

Lot Essay

Using a combination of natural materials, including hessian, paper, and ceramics, Nnenna Okore weaves fluid forms that speak of decay and renewal. Her sculptures are poetic odes to the natural world; as she states, ‘My inspirations derive from varying organic forms in nature, I am especially captivated by the ephemeral passage of time'. Lace is an intricate work made up from clay and rope with circular interlinking forms that represent organic natural elements such as roots and veins. The repetitive and labour-intensive processes of teasing, twisting, dyeing, and sewing gives the work movement that reflects certain rhythms and forms of the natural world. Okore seeks to highlight the fragility of the Anthropocene through processes of mending and regrowth. As the artist states, ‘I am astounded by nature’s ability to regenerate. Death will always give way to birth, as the cosmic laws have ordained’ (E. Spicer, Nnenna Okore Interview, Studio International, 2017).
Born in Australia, Okore lives and works between Nigeria and the U.S. Influenced by the mentorship of El Anatsui, Okore began to broaden her scope beyond the canvas from an early age, experimenting with a diverse range of material. Okore is a 2012 Fulbright Award recipient. She is an associate professor and former chair of the Art Department at North Park University, Chicago, where she teaches Sculpture. Her work is held at the World Bank's Art Collection, Washington, D.C.; the Newark Museum, Washington, D.C.; Fondation Blachère, Provence; the Indianapolis Art Center, Indianpolis; and the Royal Collections, Abu Dhabi. Nnenna Okore is represented by October Gallery.

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