Thomas Struth (B. 1954)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Thomas Struth (B. 1954)

Museo del Prado 5, Madrid 2005

Details
Thomas Struth (B. 1954)
Museo del Prado 5, Madrid 2005
signed 'Thomas Struth' (on a label affixed to the reverse)
Chromogenic print
image: 62¼ x 78¾in. (158 x 200cm.)
sheet: 65¾ x 81 7/8in. (167 x 208cm.)
Executed in 2005, this work is number eight from an edition of ten
Provenance
Galerie Rudiger Schöttle, Munich.
Private Collection.
Exhibited
Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado, Making Time, 2007 (another from the edition exhibited, illustrated in colour, p. 26). This exhibition later travelled to Berlin, Galerie Max Hetzler.
Milan, Galleria Monica de Cardenas, Thomas Struth, 2007 (another from the edition exhibited).
Humlebæk, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Pink Caviar, 2012-2013 (another from the edition exhibited).
Durham, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Light Sensitive: Photographic Works from North Carolina Collections, 2013 (another from the edition exhibited).
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.
These lots have been imported from outside the EU for sale using a Temporary Import regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the Hammer price. VAT is also payable (at 20%) on the buyer’s Premium on a VAT inclusive basis. When a buyer of such a lot has registered an EU address but wishes to export the lot or complete the import into another EU country, he must advise Christie's immediately after the auction.
Post lot text
Another work from this edition is in the collection of the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk.

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Lot Essay


‘What I wanted to achieve with this series... is to make a statement about the original process of representing people leading to my act of making a new picture, which is in a certain way a very similar mechanism: the viewer of the works seen in the photo is an instance which finds itself in a space to which I, too, belong when I stand in front of the photo. The photos illuminate the connection and should lead the viewers away from regarding the works as mere fetish objects and initiate their own understanding or intervention in historical relationships...Therein lies a moment of pause or questioning. Because the viewers are reflected in their activity, they have to wonder what they themselves are doing at the moment’ (T. Struth, quoted in ‘Interview with Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Directions: Thomas Struth Museum Photographs, exh. cat., Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., 1992, unpaged).

In choosing Las Meninas, a painting which had captivated him when he encountered it in his youth and is revered as a mysterious treatise on painting itself, as his subject matter, Struth engages in a dialogue with art and the history of art. Indeed, in Museo del Prado 5, Struth creates a sense of immersion through the scale of the picture itself. Reproducing the image on a large-scale ensures that some of the crowd appear almost life-size, as Struth places the viewer in a direct relationship with the gallery space, creating a relationship between the viewer, the visitors to the museum and the figures in Las Meninas. The artist explained, 'my intention had been to capture, by means of photography, the way people react on the paintings, their historical entrenchment in museums, and the reception of the works in the rather awe-inspiring atmosphere of institutionalised museums... [The] idea was born to show a journey through time by establishing a connection between the topics of the paintings, the artists who had made their artistic statements in them, the visitors looking at them and me whose photographs are again exhibited in galleries' (T. Struth quoted in 'Thomas Struth: Composing Pictures', in The Leica Camera Blog, October 2011, reproduced at blog.leica-camera.com).

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