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Big names at surprising prices

Build your contemporary collection with accessibly priced works by the art world’s leading lights, from Gerhard Richter to Dan Flavin — offered in our First Open Online sale, 9-17 April

  • 1
  • Jonas Wood

Jonas Wood (b. 1977), GG2, 2015. Graphite on stationary paper. 9 x 6¼ in (23 x 16 cm). Estimate                    £7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Jonas Wood (b. 1977), GG2, 2015. Graphite on stationary paper. 9 x 6¼ in (23 x 16 cm). Estimate: £7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

In his work, Boston-born Jonas Wood (b. 1977) is constantly investigating the environment around him. In GG2 (short for ‘Grey Greek’), drawn on Gagosian Gallery stationery, he fuses Greek vase painting with modern influences like Matisse’s cut-outs and Hockney’s interiors, creating a unique visual language.

  • 2
  • Richard Prince

Richard Prince (b. 1949), I never had a penny to my name so I changed my name, 1988. Ink on paper. 8⅛ x 11½ in (20.6 x 29.3cm). Estimate £5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Richard Prince (b. 1949), I never had a penny to my name so I changed my name, 1988. Ink on paper. 8⅛ x 11½ in (20.6 x 29.3cm). Estimate: £5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

In 1984, Richard Prince started copying one-liners from The New Yorker  cartoons onto paper. This touched off his iconic series of ‘joke paintings,’ which would eventually include punch lines cribbed from famous stand-up comics.

  • 3
  • Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Cat, Crouching, circa 1957. Pen on paper. 13⅝ x 17⅞ in (34.6 x 45.5 cm). Estimate £4,000-6,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Cat, Crouching, circa 1957. Pen on paper. 13⅝ x 17⅞ in (34.6 x 45.5 cm). Estimate: £4,000-6,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Andy Warhol’s early drawings reflect the influence of European artists such as Gustav Klimt and Henri Matisse, and provide a unique window into his tremendous artistic prowess. While less visually familiar than his pop-art canvases and prints, this charming cat reminds us that even Warhol was once a young artist, just starting out.

  • 4
  • Sam Francis

Sam Francis (1923-1994), Untitled, 1991. Acrylic on paper. 19 x 28½ in (48.2 x 72.3 cm). Estimate £30,000-40,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Sam Francis (1923-1994), Untitled, 1991. Acrylic on paper. 19 x 28½ in (48.2 x 72.3 cm). Estimate: £30,000-40,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

In his art, American painter Sam Francis drew on the work of the Abstract Expressionists, as well as from Impressionism and Japanese art. For Francis, it was colour that counted above all. Executed in 1991, Untitled, with its vivid reds and yellows, is an expressive example of Francis’s departure from the grid-like, structured works he produced in the 1970s.

  • 5
  • Dan Flavin

Dan Flavin (1933-1996), untitled (to Marianne) 2, 1972. Ink and coloured pencil on graph paper. 17 x 22 in (43.2 x 55.5 cm). Estimate £15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Dan Flavin (1933-1996), untitled (to Marianne) 2, 1972. Ink and coloured pencil on graph paper. 17 x 22 in (43.2 x 55.5 cm). Estimate: £15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Dan Flavin’s brightly-coloured blue-and-yellow geometric drawing from 1970, untitled (to Marianne) 2, provides fascinating insight into the makings of the light sculptures for which he is renowned. The piece is one of a number of sketches Flavin created outlining his concept for a fluorescent light structure that was to have been exhibited in a group show at New York’s Leo Castelli Gallery. Though the installation never came to fruition, Flavin has inscribed the drawing with a dedication to Marianne Barcelona, who worked at the Leo Castelli Gallery at the time.

  • 6
  • Wolfgang Tillmans

Wolfgang Tillmans (b. 1968), Doing Well, 2001. C-print. 23⅞ x 20⅛ in (60.5 x 51cm). Estimate £40,000-60,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Wolfgang Tillmans (b. 1968), Doing Well, 2001. C-print. 23⅞ x 20⅛ in (60.5 x 51cm). Estimate: £40,000-60,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Recently celebrated in a major exhibition at London’s Tate Modern, Wolfgang Tillmans’ work transcends the boundaries between photography, painting and drawing. In Doing Well, from 2001, crimson ribbons of cascading colour are punctuated by delicate rivulets; abstract forms unfold in sinuous movements around a central linear formations. This mesmeric work is closely related to the artist’s FreischwimmerBlushesPeaches and Starstruck  series, which, as Tillmans has explained, was ‘created in the dark room without negative and without camera… purely through the manipulation of light on paper.’

  • 7
  • Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter (b. 1932), Fence (P13), 2015. Diasec mounted giclée print on aluminium. 14 x 10⅝ in (35.5 x 27 cm). Estimate £2,400-3,500. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Gerhard Richter (b. 1932), Fence (P13), 2015. Diasec mounted giclée print on aluminium. 14 x 10⅝ in (35.5 x 27 cm). Estimate: £2,400-3,500. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Gerhard Richter has produced prints, photographs, multiples and posters in edition since 1965. Fence (P13), a print published in 2015, is based on the artist’s 2008 painting Zaun (Fence), and is a stunning example of his photorealist work.

  • 8
  • George Condo

George Condo (b. 1957), Untitled, 1984. Oil on canvas. 19¾ x 15¾ in (50.2 x 40 cm). Estimate £15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

George Condo (b. 1957), Untitled, 1984. Oil on canvas. 19¾ x 15¾ in (50.2 x 40 cm). Estimate: £15,000-20,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

In Untitled, which depicts a jewel-encrusted knife thrust into a stony surface, George Condo seamlessly melds the traditions of old European painting with a strong American Pop-art influence. This haunting painting, an early example of Condo’s practice of ‘Artificial Realism’, is as mysterious as it is beautiful.

  • 9
  • Grayson Perry

Grayson Perry (b. 1960), Fucking Art Centre, 2016. Glazed ceramic. 17⅞ x 6¾ x 7⅞ in (45.5 x 17.2 x 20cm). Estimate                    £7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Grayson Perry (b. 1960), Fucking Art Centre, 2016. Glazed ceramic. 17⅞ x 6¾ x 7⅞ in (45.5 x 17.2 x 20cm). Estimate: £7,000-10,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Grayson Perry burst onto the art scene with a bang in 2003 when he was awarded the Turner Prize for his extraordinary glazed and painted earthenware. Perry’s Fucking Art Centre, donated to support London’s Battersea Art Centre, epitomises the artist’s keen sense of humour and masterful crafting.

  • 10
  • Frank Stella

Frank Stella (b. 1936), Swan Engraving Blue Green Gray, 1984. Colour etching with relief and graphite on paper. 65¾ x 52 in (167.1 x 132cm). Estimate £5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

Frank Stella (b. 1936), Swan Engraving Blue Green Gray, 1984. Colour etching with relief and graphite on paper. 65¾ x 52 in (167.1 x 132cm). Estimate: £5,000-7,000. This lot is offered in First Open Online, 9-17 April 2018

It was in the 1980s that American abstract painter Frank Stella began to develop his sculptural practice. Engraving Blue Green Grey, which could almost be a sculpture itself, amalgamates the artist’s early fascination with abstraction and printmaking and his later sculptural pieces. This work has been donated by the artist to benefit the Friends of Kayany foundation, which supports schools for Syrian refugee children in Lebanon.