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THE ROBINSON FAMILY QUEEN ANNE MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE
THE ROBINSON FAMILY QUEEN ANNE MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE

GODDARD-TOWNSEND SCHOOL, PROBABLY JOHN GODDARD (1723-1785), NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 1750-1770

Details
THE ROBINSON FAMILY QUEEN ANNE MAHOGANY TRAY-TOP TEA TABLE
GODDARD-TOWNSEND SCHOOL, PROBABLY JOHN GODDARD (1723-1785), NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND, 1750-1770
26 in. high, 31 ½ in. wide, 20 in. deep
Provenance
Descended in the Robinson, Morton and Smith families of Philadelphia and Rhode Island.
Probable line of descent:
Thomas Robinson (1730-1817)
Mary Robinson (1757-1829)
Esther Morton (1797-1865) married Daniel B. Smith (1792-1888) in 1824 Esther Wharton Smith (1836-1816)
Edward Wanton Smith, Sr. (1875-1940)
Edward Wanton Smith, Jr. (1921-2001)
Thence by descent to the current owner.

Lot Essay

Robinson's probate inventory lists "a small table', valued at $2.50, that was located in the lower entry; family records indicate that this refers to the tray-top tea table offered here, shown in situ in the Robinson House (fig. 1). The table remained in the Robinson House until 1941.

A similar table attributed to the Goddard-Townsend cabinetmakers, and with a history of descent in the Wanton-Lyman-Hazard families of Newport, is also known (see Sack, American Furniture from the Israel Sack Collection, vol. 7, p. 959, fig. P5234). This table exhibits virtually identical dimensions (26 ½ inches high, 29 ¾ inches wide, 19 ½ inches deep) and proportions, with squared cabriole legs with shaped returns, a convex molded apron and concave tray moldings with a beaded upper edge. Another virtually identical tea table, currently in the collections of the Newport Historical Society, is illustrated in Michael Moses Master Crafsmen of Newport, the Towsends and Goddards, (p. 73, figs. 2.2-2.2a). It features the same applied convex-shaped tray moldings with a beaded upper edge, a convex-shaped lower molding, gracefully tapering cabriole legs with a squared knee and delicate slipper feet.

The close professional and personal relationships between Thomas Robinson and Thomas Goddard supports the conclusion that this table was likely made in Goddard's shop.
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