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LEUPOLD, Jacob (1674-1727). Theatrum arithmetico geometricum, das ist: Schau-Platz der Rechen- und Mess-Kunst. . . . Leipzig: Christoph Zunkel, 1727.
The Origins of Cyberspace collection described as lots 1-255 will first be offered as a single lot, subject to a reserve price. If this price is not reached, the collection will be immediately offered as individual lots as described in the catalogue as lots 1-255.
LEUPOLD, Jacob (1674-1727). Theatrum arithmetico geometricum, das ist: Schau-Platz der Rechen- und Mess-Kunst. . . . Leipzig: Christoph Zunkel, 1727.

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LEUPOLD, Jacob (1674-1727). Theatrum arithmetico geometricum, das ist: Schau-Platz der Rechen- und Mess-Kunst. . . . Leipzig: Christoph Zunkel, 1727.

2o. Folding engraved plates; plate III with volvelle. Text woodcuts. In some copies page 200 is misnumbered 300. Contemporary sheep, spine tooled in blind.

FIRST EDITION of the best illustrated work on calculation and measurement published during the eighteenth century. It describes and illustrates the digital calculating machines of Schott (1668), Grillet (1673), Leibnitz (1674), Poleni (1709), and Leupold himself, along with Napier's rods and several calculation tables. It also discusses and illustrates the various analog devices available, including slide rules and sectors, and other calculating and measuring rules, as well as systems of computing using the fingers. Use of the "digits" or fingers may have been the earliest method of counting, and it evolved into systems of arithmetic shortcuts or finger computing without the need for any external devices. Finger systems were always portable, reliable, and free. Our concept of number may derive from the word "digit" for finger, and the use of base 10 in arithmetic presumably derives from our having ten fingers. When we refer to digital computers we are never far in the etymological sense from the roots of arithmetic in counting on our fingers. This is the eighth volume of Leupold's Theatrum machinarum, a nine-volume series on machine design and technology published between 1724 and 1739 (the posthumous ninth volume, entitled Theatri machinarum supplementum, was edited by Joachim Ernst Scheffler). OOC 6.
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