Ulysse Nardin. An unusual stainless steel openface keyless lever deck watch with up and down indicator, break circuit, original box and cables
Ulysse Nardin. An unusual stainless steel openface keyless lever deck watch with up and down indicator, break circuit, original box and cables

SIGNED ULYSSE NARDIN, LOCLE, SUISSE, CHRONOMETRE, MOVEMENT NO. 1284436 CASE NOS. 726038 AND 1010, CIRCA 1960

Details
Ulysse Nardin. An unusual stainless steel openface keyless lever deck watch with up and down indicator, break circuit, original box and cables
Signed Ulysse Nardin, Locle, Suisse, Chronometre, movement no. 1284436 case nos. 726038 and 1010, circa 1960
The gilt-finished jewelled lever movement numbered twice, Guillaume balance with gold poising screws, cam wheel regulator, the escape wheel pinion fitted with a cam for contact-breaking each second, steel dust cover, the silvered matte dial with large Roman numerals, blued steel spade hands, two subsidiary dials indicating 36 hours power reserve and constant seconds, in large circular case with screw back, a sliding lever to activate the circuit-breaking and transmitting pin in the band, large ball-form crown, in three-tier lacquered mahogany box numbered 128438 with integrated power supply and conductors, outer wooden box numbered 128438 with lock and leather strap, case, dust cover, dial and movement signed and numbered
64 mm. diam.

Lot Essay

"Break-Circuit" deck watches were designed to assist in surveying and mapping operations as well as solar observations and scientific experiments in remote areas requiring precise and audible time signals. These deck watches, also called survey chronometers, were highly finished and adjusted in order to meet the surveyor's and scientific's requests.

The first break-circuit mechanism was installed in 1874 by S. & J.D. Negus, Chronometer and Nautical Instruments Makers in New York.

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