Upcoming Auctions and Events

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
Antonio Nicolo Gasparo Jacobsen (American, 1850-1921)
Antonio Nicolo Gasparo Jacobsen (American, 1850-1921)

The Hudson River Day Line steamboat Armenia passing Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor

Details
Antonio Nicolo Gasparo Jacobsen (American, 1850-1921)
The Hudson River Day Line steamboat Armenia passing Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor
oil on canvas
22 x 36 in. (56 x 91.4 cm.)
Provenance
Elwin M. Eldredge (friend and patron of Jacobsen)
The Mariners Museum, Newport News, Virginia
Literature
Donald C. Ringwall, The Mary Powell, Berkley, California, 1972.
Sale room notice
This lot does not come with a frame. It is displayed in a frame on loan from Eli Wilner & Company, and is available for purchase. Please inquire within the department for details.

Lot Essay

The Hudson River Day Line steamboat Armenia was built in New York City in 1847 by Thomas Collyer. Registering 528 tons she measure 185 feet in length by 28 feet in breadth by 8 feet depth hold. At her launching she was the largest and finest steamship on the Hudson River. She offered luxurious on board amenities, including restaurants, barber shops, parlors and live music which included a steam calliope- a musical instrument intended to attract passengers from competing steamers. She entered the New York to Albany day service in 1848, but was regularly withdrawn for other routes, and it was some years later that she began a number of continuous seasons on the run. She was a fast steamship, but by 1859 larger rivals had entered service and the decision was made to lengthen Armenia to 200 feet.
On May 1st, 1869 she opened the new and shorter New York to Rondout route and continued to be a popular vessel. In 1875 she opened the New York to Albany season, and the following year ran between Brooklyn and Newburgh. In 1883 she was sold to the Henry brothers & Co. of Baltimore and used as an excursion vessel between Washington, D.C. and Lower Cedar Point, where the Henrys owned a hotel and resort. While laid up for the winter at Alexandria, V.A. she caught fire on January 5th, 1886 and was scuttled to put out the flames.
;

More from Maritime Art Including Fine Paintings, Nautical Antiques, Scrimshaw And Ship Models

View All
View All