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BAHRAM GUR ASCENDS TO THE THRONE

INJU SHIRAZ, FIRST HALF 14TH CENTURY

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BAHRAM GUR ASCENDS TO THE THRONE
INJU SHIRAZ, FIRST HALF 14TH CENTURY
From the Shahnama of Firdawsi, gouache heightened with gold on paper, Bahram Gur wearing gold robes embroidered with lotus flowers sits on a large throne, one hand resting on his knee, the other raised to his chest, around him sit and stand a number of subjects in brightly coloured robes, above and below lines of small neat naskh with titles in larger red thuluth, with double gold intercolumnar rules, the verso with 33ll. of similar naskh, areas of waterstaining, some later owner's notes
Miniature 4 x 6in. (10.2 x 15.1cm.) at largest; folio 11½ x 8 1/8in. (29.1 x 21cm.)
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VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 17.5% on the buyer's premium.

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Lot Essay

This miniature comes from the dispersed Stephens Shahnama, the bulk of which was in the collection of the Hagop Kevorkian Fund and sold at Sotheby's, 12 April 1976, lot 190. The Stephens Shahnama, which, prior to being partly dispersed, was exhibited in the International Exhibition of Persian Art in London 1931, is one of a group of four large scale Inju Shahnamas produced in Shiraz in the first half of the fourteenth century. The most famous of these is that produced in 1341 of which folios more frequently appear on the market (see for example one sold in these Rooms, 23 October 2007, lot 172). The other two are complete and are now in the Topkapi (dated 1330) and the Hermitage (dated 1333). Two folios from our manuscript are illustrated in Laurence Binyon et al., Persian Miniature Painting, New York, 1971, no. 22, pl. XIII, p. 43, and the argument is there convincingly made that this is in fact the earliest of the four manuscripts.

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