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A VERY RARE PINK OVERLAY WHITE GLASS VASE
A VERY RARE PINK OVERLAY WHITE GLASS VASE

CARVED CYCLICAL DINGCHOU DATE, CORRESPONDING TO 1877 AND OF THE PERIOD

Details
A VERY RARE PINK OVERLAY WHITE GLASS VASE CARVED CYCLICAL DINGCHOU DATE, CORRESPONDING TO 1877 AND OF THE PERIOD Of slender ovoid shape with tall slightly flared neck, the reddish-pink overlay very thinly and finely carved to the opaque white ground with swallows, two bats and two butterflies in flight amidst flowering prunus, bamboo, chrysanthemum, peony and orchid, with several birds perched in the prunus branches, the colour of the overaly becoming darker in the band of pierced ornamental rocks at the bottom and shading to deep raspberry red in the rounded foot, all below an inscription carved in cameo on the neck, Dingchou Nian Li Shi Zuo, 'Made in the Dingchou year by Master Li', followed by a seal, Li, and another inscription, Sishi Ruyi, with a seal, Weizhi Zhenwan, 'Treasured object of Weizhi', carved on the base 6 3/4 in. (17.2 cm.) high
Provenance
The Elizabeth Parke Firestone Collection, Part II, sold at Christie's New York, 22 March 1991, lot 504
Literature
C.F. Shangraw and C. Brown, A Chorus of Colors: Chinese Glass from Three American Collections, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, 1995, no. 93
E.B. Curtis (ed.), Pure Brightness Shines Everywhere: The Glass of China, 2004, p. 112, fig. 12.6

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Lot Essay

The inscribed phrase, Sishi Ruyi, may be translated as 'May all your wishes come true during the Four Seasons', and relates to the depiction of seasonal plants on the vase.

The present vase is discussed in Pure Brightness Shines Everywhere: The Glass of China, Emily Byrne Curtis (ed.), 2004, p. 111, illustrated p. 112, fig. 12.6. The style of carving is described as being reminiscent of the style of painters known as the 'Eccentric Painters of Yangzhou'. One of these painters, Wang Su, is listed in the Biographies of Seal Carvers, indicating he was also a seal carver, capable of working with glass, and a group of carved glass snuff bottles, of the 'seal school' type, are signed by Wang Su. This may also have been true of other artists who had settled in or near Yangzhou, including Li Junting. The name Master Li in the inscription on the present vase, as well as the seal on the base, Weizhi zhenwan, may refer to Li Junting, as one of his art names is Weizhi. The authors also illustrate, p. 112, fig. 12.7, a carved glass snuff bottle with an inscription which includes the name Master Li of Jingjiang. Li Junting was a known philanthropist from Yangzhou and was active during the late 19th century.

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