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[LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865)]. [LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES]. Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, In the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois...As carefully prepared by the reporters of each party, and published at the times of their delivery. Columbus, [Ohio]: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860.
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[LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865)]. [LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES]. Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, In the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois...As carefully prepared by the reporters of each party, and published at the times of their delivery. Columbus, [Ohio]: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860.

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[LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865)]. [LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES]. Political Debates Between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, In the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois...As carefully prepared by the reporters of each party, and published at the times of their delivery. Columbus, [Ohio]: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860.

Tall 8vo 9 1/8 x 6 in. (232 x 155mm). Original publisher's terra-cotta cloth. Covers decoratively blind-stamped, spine gilt-lettered DEBATES OF LINCOLN . Corners a bit rubbed, spine worn at extremities, minor split in rear hinge, the usual foxing to text, with an early manuscript poem "Old Grimes" tipped to front flyleaf, otherwise A VERY GOOD COPY, the gilt-lettering on spine very bright. Sold with a custom-made display cabinet. Howes L388; Leroy 18; Monaghan 69; Sabin 41154.

FIRST EDITION OF THE LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES: INSCRIBED BY LINCOLN TO AN ILLINOIS REPUBLICAN LAWYER: "To Hon: Jackson Grimshaw with respects of A. Lincoln." On the same page are two ownership inscriptions, one dated 1876, the other 1959. Lincoln's inscription (in pencil) bold and clear. First edition with the usual points: no line over publisher's slug on title verso, numeral "2" at bottom of page 17.
FIRST EDITION OF THE MOST IMPORTANT DEBATES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. "Just as the printed Cooper Union speech was a major factor in the groundswell of support which swept Lincoln to the nomination, so were the published Debates a significant influence in his winning of the presidency six months later" (Leroy). The text of these, the most celebrated forensic debates in American political history, was typeset from Lincoln's campaign scrapbook (now in the Library of Congress), containing pasted newspaper transcripts of his and Douglas' addresses from the Chicago Press and Tribune, the Chicago Times and elsewhere. The collected edition was published a few months before Lincoln won the presidential nomination at the Republican party convention. The Debates became a best-seller -- reflecting the deepening national controversy over slavery and its extension westward. At least 30,000 copies were sold in a matter of months. Lincoln received 100 author's copies to distribute; a 1954 census by Pratt located only 18 inscribed copies. Others have come to light since then. All but three copies are inscribed in pencil. Apparently, after inscribing a few copies in ink, Lincoln noticed its tendency to "feather," due to the absorbent paper, so he inscribed the other copies in pencil. A careful census in David Leroy's thorough new study enumerates 42 inscribed copies, many in institutional collections (David H. Leroy, Mr. Lincoln's Book: Publishing the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, New Castle and Chicago, 2009, pp.154-167.

[Joseph] Jackson Grimshaw (1820-1875) of Quincy, Illinois, became a close associate of Lincoln. Grimshaw and his brother William formed a law partnership in Pittsfield, moving to Quincy in 1857. Lincoln and Grimshaw were involved in a number of cases, sometime on opposite sides. Grimshaw attended the Bloomington convention of May 1856 which led to the formation of the Republican Party in Illinois. He played an important role in Illinois Republican politics and supported Lincoln's unsuccessful Congressional campaign of 1858. Their shared political sentiments were evidenced on 1 February 1860, when Lincoln and Grimshaw jointly addressed a "large and enthusiastic meeting" in Springfield.

Provenance:
1. [Joseph] Jackson Grimshaw (1820-1875), gift from Abraham Lincoln
2. J.F. Carrott, also of Quincy (inscription dated March 1876), evidently purchased at a sale of Grimshaw's possessions the year after his death
3. Matthew Finley Carrott, as recorded in Pratt's 1954 census
4. A descendant (sale, Christie's, 8 June 1990, lot 105).

Sale Room Notice
The copy of Lincoln-Douglas Debates exhibits all first edition points. It is almost certainly likely to have been one of the first copies off the press, supplied to Lincoln for presentation purposes.

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