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Ulysse Nardin. A Brass and Mahogany Two-Day Deck Watch with Power Reserve Indication

This lot is offered without reserve.
Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.
Ulysse Nardin. A Brass and Mahogany Two-Day Deck Watch with Power Reserve Indication

SIGNED ULYSSE NARDIN, LE LOCLE, GENÈVE, NO. 3018, CIRCA 1945

Details
Ulysse Nardin. A Brass and Mahogany Two-Day Deck Watch with Power Reserve Indication Signed Ulysse Nardin, Le Locle, Genève, No. 3018, Circa 1945 Three quarter plate gilt-finished jeweled Earnshaw's spring detent movement, bi-metallic compensation balance, blued spiral spring and regulator, silvered matte dial, Roman numerals, outer calibrated fifth seconds, 56 hour power reserve indication at the 12 position, subsidiary seconds, blued steel spade hands, all within a brass bowl, all set in hinged three tiered brass bound mahagony box, screw down glass cover, case, dial and movement signed and numbered 137mm square, 28mm height
Special Notice

This lot is offered without reserve.
Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

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Lot Essay

Marine Chronometers are highly accurate clocks kept aboard ships to aid in navigation. They were developed in the 18th century by John Harrison, and at the time were considered a major technical achievement.

Navigators needed to be able to determine longitude, which meant they needed a time standard that would work aboard a ship. Ordinary clocks were of no use at sea due to temperature changes and the ship's motion. A chronometer is set to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), and the time difference between the chronometer and the ship's time were used to calculate the longitude of the ship.
Although considered a secondary means of navigation today, the chronometer is the only navigational method that is completely self-reliant, especially in the event of loss of power or radio communications

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