AN EMPIRE ORMOLU-MOUNTED BRONZE AND MARBLE STRIKING MANTEL CLOCK
PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION 
AN EMPIRE ORMOLU-MOUNTED BRONZE AND MARBLE STRIKING MANTEL CLOCK

NICOD, PARIS, CIRCA 1810

Details
AN EMPIRE ORMOLU-MOUNTED BRONZE AND MARBLE STRIKING MANTEL CLOCK
NICOD, PARIS, CIRCA 1810
CASE: in the form of an amphora with elongated angular handles issuing from lion masks, lanceolate leaves and palmettes above the waisted socle, the rouge griotte plinth with ribbon-tied weaths and oil lamps DIAL: the white enamel dial with Roman chapters and pierced gilt hands signed 'Nicod Jne. à Paria Ruë des Sts. Perea No.1225' MOVEMENT: the twin barrel movement with recoil anchor escapement, silk suspension and countwheel strike on bell
25 7/8 in. (65.7 cm.) high; the base 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) wide; 6¾ in. (17.1 cm.) deep
Provenance
Lawrence Harvey and Pauline Stone collection, Hampstead (until 1973).
Private collection, Monaco

Brought to you by

Casey Rogers
Casey Rogers

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Lot Essay

This impossing clock model can be dated to circa 1806 on the basis of the same vase-form clock now at the château de Malmaison. This latter clock was originally supplied on 10 October 1806 for the Grand Cabinet of the Secretary of State, Maret at the château de Fontainebleau. Valued at 750FF by the horloger Bailly in December of that same year, the clock remained at Fontainebleau throughout the Empire period, before being moved to Malmaison in 1907. This clock is discussed in B. Chevallier, 'La Mesure du Temps dans les Collections du Muse de Malmaison', Exhibition Catalogue, 29 May - 15 September 1991, no.6, p.13 (illustrated) and further in J.P Samoyault, 'Pendules et bronzes d'ameublement entrs sous le Premier Empire', Paris, 1989, p. 82, no. 48.
Jeune Nicod (or Nicot) is recorded as active in Rue des Sts. Pères, 1806 - 1840.

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