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THE JOSEPH SEWALL SILVER TANKARD
PROPERTY OF OLD SOUTH CHURCH IN BOSTON
THE JOSEPH SEWALL SILVER TANKARD

MARK OF JOHN EDWARDS, BOSTON, CIRCA 1730

Details
THE JOSEPH SEWALL SILVER TANKARD
MARK OF JOHN EDWARDS, BOSTON, CIRCA 1730
Tapering cylindrical, the stepped domed cover with baluster finial, the scroll handle with oval terminal, the front engraved with the arms of Sewall and engraved under base: Given to the South-Church./1730, marked near handle and on cover with Kane mark C, also with paper label 1480.11 Old South
8 ¾ in. (21.9 cm.) high; 29 oz. (910 gr.)
Literature
E. Alfred Jones, Old Silver of American Churches, 1913, pp. 53-54, illus. Plate XX
Patricia E. Kane, Colonial Massachusetts Silversmiths and Jewelers, 1998, p. 419

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Abby Starliper
Abby Starliper American Furniture Specialist

Lot Essay

Church tradition holds that this tankard, engraved with the Sewall arms, was given by the family to commemorate the membership of Samuel Sewall (1652-1730), a judge in the Salem Witch Trials. Sewall however is better known as the author of his famous diaries, begun in 1674. Samuel Sewall’s Diaries, 1674-1729 remain an important historical reference for the early Colonial period. In 1700, he published The Selling of Joseph, America’s first anti-slavery tract.

This tankard was almost certainly donated by Samuel Sewall’s son, Reverend Joseph Sewall (1688-1769), the pastor of Old South Church from 1713 to 1769.

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