A GILT-STEEL POWDER HORN
VARIOUS PROPERTIES
A GILT-STEEL POWDER HORN

INDIA, 18TH CENTURY

Details
A GILT-STEEL POWDER HORN
INDIA, 18TH CENTURY
Realistically cast in the shape of a leaping gazelle, the diminutive head of a deer between its rear hooves, with crenellated stopper
8in. (20.2cm.) long

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Sara Plumbly
Sara Plumbly

Lot Essay

Ivory gunpowder horns from India and Iran are integrating animal forms illustrative of hunting scenes. Bird or fsh shaped primers are published in Allan and Gilmour, 2000, nos. A.28 and A.29, p.179. The recurring motif of a leaping antelope, a prize game for skilled hunter, lends itself to near perfection with its elegant and slender form to the powder horn. Several comparable pieces in ivory are known, some of which can be traced in European inventories to the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. A particularly elaborate example was in the collection of Prince Elector Johann Georg II of Saxony in 1658, while another in Denmark is noted in an inventory of 1737 (Skelton, Robert. The Indian Heritage: Court Life & Arts Under Mughal Rule: Victoria & Albert Museum, 21 April-22 August 1982. London, 1982, nos.439 and 440, p.135).

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