A SET OF SIX RARE AND IMPORTANT CHARLES II SILVER CANDLESTICKS
A SET OF SIX RARE AND IMPORTANT CHARLES II SILVER CANDLESTICKS
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On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial int… Read more
A SET OF SIX RARE AND IMPORTANT CHARLES II SILVER CANDLESTICKS

CIRCA 1670

Details
A SET OF SIX RARE AND IMPORTANT CHARLES II SILVER CANDLESTICKS
CIRCA 1670
On a stepped square base with canted corners, the circular well rising to hexagonal baluster stem surmounted by an elongated hexagonal socket, with flat fixed nozzle, base engraved in one corner with a coat-of-arms flanked by acanthus and in another corner with a slightly later earl's coronet, apparently unmarked
8 1/8 in. (20.6 cm.) high; 115 oz. 10 dwt.(3,592 gr.)

The arms are those of Cooper impaling Manners, for Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury (1652-1699) and his wife Lady Dorothy, daughter of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland, who he married in 1669. He succeeded to the earldom on the death of his father in 1683.
Provenance
Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury (1652-1699) and by descent to
Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 9th Earl of Shaftesbury (1869-1961).
The Earl of Shaftesbury; Christie's, London, 17 December 1952, lot 172.
Acquired from Stuart and Turner, London, June 1953.
Literature
D. Fennimore et al., The David and Peggy Rockefeller Collection: Decorative Arts, New York, 1992, vol. IV, p. 381, no. 418 (illustrated).
Special notice

On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial interest in the outcome of the sale of certain lots consigned for sale. This will usually be where it has guaranteed to the Seller that whatever the outcome of the auction, the Seller will receive a minimum sale price for the work. This is known as a minimum price guarantee. This is a lot where Christie’s holds a direct financial guarantee interest.

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Lot Essay

In 1953, when Peggy and I were in London for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, Cecil Turner invited us to the opening of the Antique Dealers' Fair at Grosvenor House. We were admitted before the general public and thus were able to stroll around at our leisure. Before going, Peggy told me, rather sternly, that I was not to buy anything unless we really wanted it and could use it. We had been in the hall for only ten minutes when Peggy spotted these candlesticks from about one hundred feet away. She immediately told Cecil Turner that she would like to have them, and he was able to arrange their purchase. I disapproved of Peggy's violating the rule that she had established, but I have enjoyed the candlesticks very much over the years. In addition to their innate beauty, they are also of interest because they belonged, until we bought them, to the illustrious Shaftesbury family, for whom they had been made more than three hundred years ago. - David Rockefeller. (D. Fennimore et al., p. 381).

The present candlesticks were probably commissioned on the occasion of the marriage of Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury’s and Lady Dorothy Manners, daughter of 8th Earl of Rutland, in 1669. Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury was elected a member of parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in 1673, a seat he held until 1679.

The 2nd Earl of Shaftesbury’s home was St Giles House, East Dorset, a seat still in the family. The present candlesticks remained in the family until their sale in 1952. Prominent owners of them have included the 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury (1671–1713), who is remembered chiefly as a writer and philosopher and the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (1801-1885), a noted philanthropist and social reformer. Christopher Hussey published three articles about St Giles in Country Life (See, Country Life, "St. Giles's House, Dorset," September 10, 17, 24, 1943).

A similar set of four Charles II silver candlesticks, mark of Jacob Bodendick, London, 1677 were sold Anonymous sale; Christie's London, 24 October 2002, lot 313 and published The Glory of the Goldsmith: Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, London, 1989, no. 37, p. 57.

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