A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SOFA
This lot will be removed to Christie’s Park Royal.… Read more PROPERTY FROM A DAVID HICKS INTERIOR, LOTS 248-282
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SOFA

IN THE MANNER OF MAYHEW AND INCE, CIRCA 1775-80

Details
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SOFA
IN THE MANNER OF MAYHEW AND INCE, CIRCA 1775-80
The curved back carved with a Herculian lion's pelt and lions' head terminals to the arms, covered in textured suede, reduced in length
38.5 in. (98 cm.) high; 49 ½ in. (125 cm.) wide; 28 in. (71.5 cm.) deep
Special notice

This lot will be removed to Christie’s Park Royal. Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent offsite. Our removal and storage of the lot is subject to the terms and conditions of storage which can be found at Christies.com/storage and our fees for storage are set out in the table below - these will apply whether the lot remains with Christie’s or is removed elsewhere. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Christie’s Park Royal. All collections from Christie’s Park Royal will be by pre-booked appointment only. Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Email: cscollectionsuk@christies.com. If the lot remains at Christie’s it will be available for collection on any working day 9.00 am to 5.00 pm. Lots are not available for collection at weekends.

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Celia Harvey
Celia Harvey

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Lot Essay

This sofa or marquise, with its Nemean lion-pelt of Hercules displayed as nailed drapery across its back, and the hero's head displayed in a spray of Roman acanthus on the seat-rail, is designed in the ‘French’ fashion of the 1770s. It is similar to a larger suite of seat-furniture, which comprised a giltwood sofa, 86 in. (218 cm.) wide, sold Christie’s, 27 November 2003, lot 59.
The pelt-drapery and Hercules mask feature on a related set of armchairs formerly at Bramshill, Hampshire, possibly introduced there by Sir Denzil Cope (d. 1812) (illustrated in situ in Country Life, 11 July 1903, p. 56; C. Hussey, Bramshill-IV, Country Life, 23 June 1923, pp. 886-887). A settee of the same pattern but with tapered front legs, from the collection of Michael Henry Blount (d. 1874) is at Mapledurham House, Oxfordshire (R. Williams, Mapledurham House, St. Ives, 1977, p. 10).
The distinctive arched back, with hollowed base-rail, corresponds to a form adopted by the Golden Square cabinet-makers, Mayhew & Ince; see the suite supplied in the 1780s for Chirk Castle, Wrexham (C. Hussey, 'Chirk Castle, Denbighshire, - IV', Country Life, 12 October 1951, p. 1149, fig. 4 and G. Beard & C. Gilbert (eds.), The Dictionary of English Furniture Makers, Leeds, 1986, p. 596). Mayhew & Ince notably incorporated idiosyncratic zoomorphic motifs to enhance their furniture. See: the ram’s head masks on a pair of urns supplied by the partnership for Lord Kerry’s Dining Room at Portman Square, now in the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight (C. Cator, ‘The Earl of Kerry and Mayhew and Ince…’, Furniture Hisory, 1990, figs. 3, 4); the carved giltwood dolphins, originally part of the cresting of one of the pier glasses in the Oval Drawing Room, part of the partnership's 1785 commission for James Alexander, 1st Earl of Caledon (H. Roberts, ‘Unequall’d Elegance…’, Furniture History, 2009, fig. 8); a pair of marquetry tripod stands, with ivory ram’s head capitals, attributed to Mayhew & Ince, sold Christie’s, London, 5 July 2012, lot 32.

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