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A KAZAK RUG
A KAZAK RUG
A KAZAK RUG
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Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a fill… Read more PROPERTY FROM A RESIDENCE IN WILTON CRESCENT
A KAZAK RUG

SOUTH CAUCASUS, MID 19TH CENTURY

Details
A KAZAK RUG
SOUTH CAUCASUS, MID 19TH CENTURY
Minor touches of light wear and localised spots of restoration, overall good condition.
8ft.5in. x 6ft.4in. (256cm. x 193cm.)
Provenance
Anon sale, Christie's London, 8 October 2009, lot 27
Special notice

Specifed lots (sold and unsold) marked with a filled square ( ¦ ) not collected from Christie’s, 8 King Street, London SW1Y 6QT by 5.00 pm on the day of the sale will, at our option, be removed to Crown Fine Art (details below). Christie’s will inform you if the lot has been sent ofsite. If the lot is transferred to Crown Fine Art, it will be available for collection from 12.00 pm on the second business day following the sale. Please call Christie’s Client Service 24 hours in advance to book a collection time at Crown Fine Art. All collections from Crown Fine Art will be by prebooked appointment only.

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Louise Broadhurst
Louise Broadhurst

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Lot Essay

The arrangement of rows of ocatgonal guls on the present rug is often associated with Kazak rugs of the south Caucasus however the intricate filler decoration of multiple interlocking hooked stems within each gul is less common. Ian Bennett illustrates two smaller Gendje rugs with single column formations of similar guls (I. Bennett, Caucasian Rugs, London, 1981, pl.151 & 152), while a rarer, multiple-columned rug sold at Nagel, 15 November, 1996, lot 61. There is, perhaps, more than a passing resemblance to the distinct hooked palmettes frequently used by the Kashkuli nomadic weavers in south Persia which are recorded by Robert Pinner as having appeared in some paintings of Hans Memling as far back as the 14th century (James Opie, Tribal Rugs of Southern Persia, Portland, 1981, p.40). The heightened amount of yellow, ivory and azzure-blue in the colour palette of this rug is notable and is another highly attractive element of its overall appearance.



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