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A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE
A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE
A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE
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A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE
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Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more PROPERTY OF A DIRECT DESCENDANT OF THE CHINESE IMPERIAL FAMILY
A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE

LATE QING DYNASTY

Details
A CARVED HONGMU LUOHAN BED AND A KANG TABLE
LATE QING DYNASTY
The stepped back is finely carved in relief with three roundels, each enclosing a pair of dragons contesting a flaming pearl framed by leafy scrolls on either side. The two side railings are similarly carved with one roundel, all above the rectangular seat and a waist carved with leiwen and beaded apron further carved with archaistic dragons. The whole is raised on carved, thick, incurved legs of square section terminating in hoof feet. The kang table is carved en suite.
Bed: 38 in. (96.5 cm.) high, 82 3/8 in. (209.2 cm.) wide, 45 in. (114.3 cm.) deep
Table: 7 ¾ in. (19.7 cm.) high, 32 7/8 in. (83.5 cm.) wide, 17 ¼ in. (43.8 cm.) deep
Provenance
Prince Duan (1856-1923, also known as Zaiyi), and thence by descent within the family.
Special Notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦)
Vicki Paloympis (潘薇琦) Vice President, Specialist, Head of Sale

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Lot Essay


Literary texts suggest that luohan beds were also considered part of everyday furnishings and were used in both formal and semi-formal interiors. Unlike canopy beds, luohan beds could be used to formally receive guests, and is often matched with a small kang table as a set for this purpose. For a discussion of the varied uses of this style of bed, see Sarah Handler, "Comfort and Joy: A Couch Bed for Day and Night," Journal of the Classical Chinese Furniture Society, Winter 1991, pp. 4-19.

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