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ELAINE DE KOONING (1919-1989)
ELAINE DE KOONING (1919-1989)
ELAINE DE KOONING (1919-1989)
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Property of an Important Private Collector
ELAINE DE KOONING (1918-1989)

Echo Wall (Cave #68)

Details
ELAINE DE KOONING (1918-1989)
Echo Wall (Cave #68)
signed with the artist's initials 'E de K' (lower right)
acrylic on canvas
84 x 66 in. (213.4 x 167.6 cm.)
Painted in 1986/1988.
Provenance
Fischbach Gallery, New York
Cline Fine Art Gallery, Santa Fe
Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1995
Exhibited
Miami, Guggenheim Gallery, Elaine de Kooning Cave Walls, December 1986-January 1987 (exhibited as Calcium Wall).
Los Angeles, Wenger Gallery, Elaine de Kooning Cave Walls, March-April 1987 (exhibited as Calcium Wall).
East Hampton, Vered Art Gallery, Elaine de Kooning Horns and Hooves, September 1987 (exhibited as Calcium Wall).
New York, Fischbach Gallery, Elaine de Kooning: Recent Paintings, November 1988, no. 28.
Santa Fe, Cline Fine Art Gallery, Elaine de Kooning: Paintings and Drawings, August-November 1995, no. 31.

Brought to you by

Isabella Lauria
Isabella Lauria Associate Vice President, Specialist

Lot Essay

A dazzling polyphony of color and space where horses, bison, and elk roam in horizonless profiles, Echo Wall (Cave #68) (1986/1988) reveals Elaine de Kooning’s genius for sustaining depiction, evocation and abstraction simultaneously. Exhibited three times in 1987 as the second panel of a diptych (Calcium Wall, 1986), the present work was returned to the artist’s studio after its national tour and set free from a dichotomous past. Its creatures range distant and near, fissured, striated and creviced, as though transfused by scars of time, underscoring the artist’s skill in multi-spatial juxtaposition. And, like her paleolithic predecessors, Elaine de Kooning brought her own light into the caves: rejecting torchlight and underground darkness, Echo Wall echoes poetic light—sunless yet radiant, crystalline, opalescent, diaphanous, refractive—with the immediacy of a lightning bolt.

—Edvard Lieber, 2021

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