A NAGASONE KATANA
A NAGASONE KATANA
A NAGASONE KATANA
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A NAGASONE KATANA
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PROPERTY FROM THE KAISENDO MUSEUM COLLECTION
A NAGASONE KATANA

EARLY EDO PERIOD (17TH CENTURY), SIGNED NAGASONE OKISATO NYUDO KOTETSU

Details
A NAGASONE KATANA
EARLY EDO PERIOD (17TH CENTURY), SIGNED NAGASONE OKISATO NYUDO KOTETSU
Configuration [sugata]: hon-zukuri, iori-mune, shallow curvature, chu-kissaki, bohi on both side with kaku-dome
Forging pattern [kitae]: fine ko-itame with ji-nie
Tempering pattern [hamon]: gunome midare in notare, deep nioi in lower part, some sunagashi, kinsuji in upper part of blade
Tip [boshi]: broad komaru with hakikake
Tang [nakago]: ubu, file marks (yasurime): katte-sagari, end (nakagojiri): Ha-agari kurijiri tip, holes (mekugi-ana): three (one plugged)
Length from tip to beginning of tang [nagasa]: 71cm.; curvature 1.4cm.; width at start of tempered edge 3.2cm.; width before tip 2.2cm.
Collar [habaki]: double-gilt copper
In shirasaya (plain wood scabbard)
Mounting [koshirae]: Red lacquer katana koshirae, shibuichi ishimeji fuchi-kashira, shakudo menuki formed as a bull, eyes in gilt, iron tsuba carved with two bulls, 99.5cm

Accompanied by a Tokubetsu Hozon Token certificate (Sword especially worthy of preserving), no.101907, 3 August 1988 issued by the Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai (Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Art Sword)
Provenance
Okubo Tadahiro known as Ichio (1818-1888), by repute
‌Kaisendo Museum, Yamagata, Japan
Literature
Sugihara Shozo ed., Nagasone Kotetsu no Kenkyu (The study on Nagasone Kotetsu) (Osaka: Sugihara Nihontogaku kenkyujo, 1926), rf. 55.
Honma Junji and Sato Kanichi in Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai ed., Zoho kaitei Kotetsu Taikan (Overview of Kotetsu, revised and enlarged edition) (Tokyo: Otsuka Kogeisha, 1974), no.174
Ogasawara Nobuo ed., Nagasone Kotetsu Shinko (New study on Nagasone Kotetsu) (Tokyo: Yuzankaku, 1973), p.157
Sale room notice
Please note that regarding condition, this lot has some very minor surface rust.

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Brought to you by

Takaaki Murakami(村上高明)
Takaaki Murakami(村上高明) Vice President, Specialist and Head of Department | Japanese Art

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Lot Essay

Nagasone Kotestu who is universally regarded as the greatest of the Shinto period (1596-1763) swordsmiths, was originally trained as armor maker in Echizen. He then moved to Edo and turned to swordsmith when he was around fifty years old. It is thought that he was taught sword making by Izumi no kami Kaneshige. Kotetsu became the most influential of the smiths working in Edo during his lifetime, and several smiths emulated his characteristic hamon, including the so-called juzuba, a form of gunome resembling a row of rosary beads. Kotetsu was originally named Okisato, but after becoming a lay priest he styled himself first Nyudo (entered the Way) Okisato, then Kotetsu with the characters for 'old steel', to Kotestu meaning 'tiger piercing' , and finally two different characters for 'tiger'. He had a close relation with the most influential people in the sword world, like the Hon'ami sword appraiser family, the polisher Kiya, and Yamano Kanjuro the sword tester.
This sword is believed to be made during 7th-12th year of Kanbun era (1667-1672). This work is illustrated right next to the famous Kotestu sword with gold inlay inscription “Shinmyo Ichio’s favorite item”. Okubo Ichio (1817-1888) worked for Tokugawa Ienari and played many important roles as a senior retainer at the end of the Tokugawa regime in late 19th century.
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