A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)
A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)
A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)
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A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)
17 More
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)

EDO PERIOD (18TH CENTURY), HELMET BOWL: KAMAKURA PERIOD (13-14TH CENTURY)

Details
A BLUE-LACED HONKOZANE DAIMYO DOMARU GUSOKU (ARMOR)
EDO PERIOD (18TH CENTURY), HELMET BOWL: KAMAKURA PERIOD (13-14TH CENTURY)
Helmet [kabuto]:
The twenty six-plate Kamakura period hoshi bachi kabuto (“star bowl,” alluding to the protruding rivets) of rounded form, with elaborate gilt and copper hachimanza (decorative fixture at the central aperture) of four-tier, with gilt shinodare (four sets of pendant arrow shaped decorative pieces) set on silver plates, the bowl with four hibiki-no-ana (small holes adjacent to protruding rivets with vestiges of textile), with gilt kuwagata-dai (fixture for two gilt horns) pierced with scrolling chrysanthemums on silver plate and applied with three gilt chrysanthemum shaped rivets, the maedate (fore-crest) of a large gilt jyanome-mon (family crest of snake eye), gilt fukurin (edging) engraved with scrolling, the interior of the helmet bowl lacquered in gold

Neck guard [shikoro]:
The wide and gently curving kasa-jikoro ("straw hat," or "umbrella"-shape neck guard) of blue lacing kebikiodoshi (close-lacing) of lacquered iron shittsukezane (plate in semblance of individual lamellae) with orange hishi-nui (decorative cross-knots) around the lower two tiers, the large double fukigaeshi (turn-backs) clad with leather with gilt jyanome-mon (family crest of snake eye)

Face mask [menpo]:
The hammered russet iron ressei-style menpo (face mask) with detachable nose and large ears, the moustache finely decorated in gold, applied with fine gilt fukurin (edging) of a nanako ('fish-roe') ground, the mouth wide open with red lips and gilded teeth, red lacquered interior, applied with the ase-nagashi (sweat hole) and odayori nokugi (cord hooks) under the chin, with three-tier yodarekake (bib) of lacquered iron shittsukezane (plate in semblance of individual lamellae) with agemaki-no-kan (ring to hold a decorative bow), the nodowa (gorget throat protector ) of two-tiers of honkozane

Cuirass [do]:
The black lacquered iron honkozane domaru (cuirass) of blue lacing kebikiodoshi (close-lacing), applied with sendan no ita and kyubi no ita with gilt jyanome-mon (family crest of snake eye), the sendanno ita and kyubi no ita clad with leather, the large fixture of agemaki-no-kan (ring to hold a decorative bow) on reverse side pierced with scrolling chrysanthemums, the eight kusazuri (skirt) in five tiers of honkozane of lacquered iron plates

Sleeves and shoulder guards [kote and sode]:
The russet iron sanbon tsutsugote (sleeves) with hinges finely decorated with clouds, wave, two-sided sword and hanabishi (stylized flower), O-sode (large shoulder guards) of gold and black lacquered honkozane with blue and white lacing designed with large jyanome-mon (family crest of snake eye)

Thigh protector and lower leg guards [haidate and sune-ate]:
The lacquered iron kawara haidate (thigh protectors with iron plates in the form of roof tiles), the russet iron sanbon tsutsusuneate (lower leg guards) with stylized flower hinges, black lacquered leather kogake (foot guards)

Accessories:
The saihai (paper signal baton), a wood armor storage box

Accompanied by a certificate of registration as a Juyo bunka shiryo (Important cultural material) no. 80 issued by the Nihon Katchu Bugu Kenkyu Hozon Kai (Japanese Armor Preservation Society), dated 1969.10.26
Provenance
Kato Yasutake (1745-1768), the seventh generation daimyo of Ozu clan, Ehime Prefecture
Literature
Kacchu bugu juyo bunka shiryo zuroku (Catalogue of important cultural materials of armor and arms), vol.1 (Tokyo: Nihon kacchu bugu kenkyu hozon kai, 2020). pp.176-177
Special notice
Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Brought to you by

Takaaki Murakami (村上高明)
Takaaki Murakami (村上高明) Vice President, Specialist and Head of Department

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Lot Essay

The classic style armor, O-yoroi was developed for use in mounted combat during the Heian period (AD794-1185) when the bow was a leading weapon. The large tehen no ana (aperture at the crown of the helmet), although arising from the method of construction using riveted plates, was originally used to fix the helmet on the head by means of the topknot. The large fukigaeshi and o-sode could be presented to the opponent as shields against his arrows, which service was also provided by the two pendant breast pieces. All early armors were composed of rows of hon-kozane (individual scales) laced together with silk braid, and some armors had double layers of such. Several hundred small scales would be used on the cuirass alone, either of hardened leather, iron, or alternating those materials. They were lacquered over in rows, and linked vertically by silk braid. The custom of making armors in classic style for both ceremonial and ritual use dates from the late Muromachi period (1392 - 1604), but was universal among the daimyo (provincial lords) during the Edo period (1604 - 1868). Such ritual armors were very expensive and worn only on certain occasions like the annual passage in and out of the capital city, Edo, but often displayed on festive occasions or dates in respect of ancestors. The custom continued even after the end of the Edo period when armor no longer fulfilled a practical function.
The iron helmet bowl of this armor is a typical example of mid-to-late Kamakura period (13th-14th century) modified by adding a neck guard, turn backs and elaborate metal parts to complete this armor made in the 18th century, most likely commissioned by Kato Yasutake (1745-1768). The helmets made during Kamakura period were very precious and sough-after among daimyo collectors of Edo period (17th-19th century). It is also notable that this helmet bowl has three cut marks presumably caused by edged weapon (sword, naginata or spear) which indicates that this bowl had survived severe battles. This type of cut marks are often described as homare-kizu (cut mark of honor), deeply revered by contemporaries and modern-day collectors.
According to the documents inherited in the Kato Family, this armor used to belong to Kato Yasutake (1745-1768), the seventh-generation daimyo of Ozu clan in Iyo Province. The Kato family, who claimed descent from the Fujiwara no Kamatari in the Asuka period, flourished under the Tokugawa shogun family from the time that Sadaysu (1580- 1623), the first-generation daimyo of the Kato Family, sided with Tokugawa leyasu at the battle of Sekigahara in 1600. Sadayasu received the field of Iyo Province (Ehime Prefecture) in 1617, and the clan held throughout the Edo period through various changes in fortune, but always prominent in military and political activities.

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