ANDRÉ MASSON (1896-1987)
ANDRÉ MASSON (1896-1987)
1 More
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more MEMORY OF A SURREAL JOURNEY: PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA COLLECTION
ANDRÉ MASSON (1896-1987)

Paysage matriarcal

Details
ANDRÉ MASSON (1896-1987)
Paysage matriarcal
signed and dated 'André Masson -41-' (lower left); dated and inscribed 'Paysage matriarcal 1941' (on the reverse)
oil on canvas
20 3/8 x 24 in. (51.8 x 61 cm.)
Painted in 1941
Provenance
Buchholz Gallery, New York.
Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris.
Fashion Institute of Technology, New York; sale, Sotheby's, New York, 30 September 1999, lot 95.
The Mayor Gallery, London.
Private collection, New York.
Gallery Wendi Norris, by whom acquired from the above.
Acquired from the above by the present owners in 2012.
Literature
D.A. Miller Birmingham, André Masson in America, the Artist's Achievement in Exile, 1941-1945, dis., The University of Michigan, 1978, no. 13, p. 297 (illustrated).
G. & M. Masson & C. Loewer, André Masson, Catalogue raisonné de l'œuvre peint, vol. II,1930-1941, Vaumarcus, 2010, no. 1937/1941*5, p. 409 (illustrated).
Exhibited
New York, Buchholz Gallery, André Masson, February - March 1942, no. 15.
Special notice
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent. This lot has been imported from outside of the UK for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable at 5% on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on our invoice.

Brought to you by

Imogen Kerr
Imogen Kerr Vice President, Senior Specialist, Co-head of 20th Century Evening Sale

Lot Essay

In 1935, Masson and his wife found themselves stranded at the top of Montserrat in Spain. The event resulted in an epiphany that became a key part of his personal mythology and in his perception linked him to the wider destiny of the universe. 'The sky itself, I thought, appeared an abyss….The vertigo of heights and the vertigo of depths both at once. I found myself in a kind of maelstrom... there were shooting stars the whole time... The whole world was entirely under a cover of clouds. The only place clear was the place where we were. And the sun rose. It was sublime. We were on our summit like Moses awaiting the arrival of the Lord' (Andre Masson, quoted in W. Rubin & C. Lanchner, André Masson, exh. cat., New York, 1976, p. 141). Six years later, in the hectic first few months of his exile in America during the dark and tremulous years of the Second World War, Masson seems to tone his experience with the sublime with apprehension and ominous premonition. Richly coloured and mythical in quality, this exquisite painting is both evocative of his earlier interest with elemental nature and the occult, and represents the upheaval of his life at the time.

More from Impressionist and Modern Art Day and Works on Paper Sale

View All
View All