ANTONIO SANTIN (B. 1978)
ANTONIO SANTIN (B. 1978)
ANTONIO SANTIN (B. 1978)
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Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)

Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close (from The Vanity of Small Differences)

Details
GRAYSON PERRY (B. 1960)
Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close (from The Vanity of Small Differences)
wool, cotton, acrylic, polyester and silk tapestry
78 3/4 x 157 1/2in. (200 x 400cm.)
Executed in 2012, this work is number six from an edition of six plus two artist's proofs
Provenance
Victoria Miro, London.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012.
Literature
J. Klein, Grayson Perry, London 2009, p. 276 (detail of another from the edition illustrated in colour on the front cover; illustrated in colour, p. 277).
C. Higgins, 'Grayson Perry gives The Vanity of Small Differences to the nation' in The Guardian, 30 November 2012.
G. Perry, The Vanity of Small Differences, London 2013, p. 66 (illustrated in colour, p. 67).
British Council, The Vanity of Small Differences, Grayson Perry, London 2015, pp. 21 (another from the edition illustrated in colour, p. 15).
Exhibited
London, Victoria Miro, Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences, 2012 (another from the edition exhibited).
London, Royal Academy of Arts, Summer Exhibition, 2013 (another from the edition exhibited).
Sunderland, Sunderland Museum, Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences, 2013-2017 (another from the edition exhibited). This exhibition later travelled to Manchester, Manchester Art Gallery; Birmingham, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery; Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery; Leeds, Temple Newsam House; Istanbul, Pera Museum; Ankara, Cer Modern; Bath, Victoria Art Gallery; Coventry, Herbert Art Gallery; Worcester, Croome; Canterbury, The Beaney; Kyiv, Izolyatsia Platform for Cultural Initiatives; Novi Sad, Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina; Pristina, National Gallery; Sarajevo, Art Gallery of Bosnia and Herzegovina; Banja Luka, Museum of Contemporary Art of Republic of Srpska and Tirana, National Gallery.
Sydney, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Grayson Perry: My Pretty Little Art Career, 2015-2016, pp. 182 and 238 (another from the edition exhibited; illustrated in colour, p. 182; detail illustrated in colour, pp. 4 and 238; installation view at Victoria Miro illustrated in colour, p. 188).
Maastricht, Bonnefanten, Grayson Perry - Hold your beliefs lightly, 2016. This exhibition later travelled to Aarhus, ARoS Kunstmuseum.
Newlyn, Newlyn Art Gallery & The Exchange, Grayson Perry: The Vanity of Small Differences, 2020-2022 (another from the edition exhibited). This exhibition later travelled to Norwich, East Gallery, Norwich University of the Arts; Rochdale, Touchstones; Hereford, Hereford Museum and Gallery; Kilmarnock, Dick Institute and Sunderland, Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens.
Special notice
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Anna Touzin
Anna Touzin Specialist, Head of Day Sale

Lot Essay

Rendered on a monumental scale, Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close is a magnificent work from Grayson Perry’s landmark series The Vanity of Small Differences: a group of six large tapestries which present a story of class mobility in Britain. Executed in 2012, the series offers a contemporary reimagination of William Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress (1732–1734). Hogarth’s eight paintings chart the downfall of Tom Rakewell, a young heir who drains his inheritance on luxurious living, is sent to debtors’ prison, and ultimately dies in a psychiatric hospital. A contrary rags-to-riches tale, Perry’s version follows Tim Rakewell, a working-class boy who swaps his humble beginnings for a life of fame and fortune. A response to his Channel 4 documentary All in the Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry (2012), which saw him visit three different social groups across Sunderland, Tunbridge Wells and the Cotswolds, the characters and objects in the series are inspired directly by Perry’s travels across Britain. With one set currently held in the Arts Council Collection, London, The Vanity of Small Differences represents one of the most important series in Perry’s oeuvre.

The third work in the series, Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close depicts Tim and his girlfriend following a fight with his mother and stepfather. They pass through a rainbow as Jamie Oliver—‘the god of social mobility’ according to Perry—looks down upon them. To the left, Tim’s family appear on an AstroTurf lawn, his stepfather having just returned from a game of golf in his luxury car. Angry, and armed with a golf club and hoover, they send the couple on their way, shooing them towards the right side of the work. Here, Tim’s girlfriend’s family sit at dinner, toasting ceremoniously to the couple’s arrival. Perry playfully details the scene from Tim’s girlfriend’s perspective: ‘I met Tim at College, he was Such a Geek. He took me back to meet his mother and Stepfather. Their house was so clean and Tidy, not a speck of dust ... Or a book, apart from her god, Jamie. She Says I have turned Tim into a Snob. His parents don’t appreciate how bright he is. My father laughed at Tim’s accent but welcomed him onto the sunlit uplands of the middle classes. I hope Tim loses his obsession with money.’

Highlighting the influence of early Renaissance painting on the series, Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close makes direct reference to Masaccio’s The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden (circa 1425), its protagonists mirroring Adam and Eve’s distraught poses. Inserting his figures in the twenty-first century, Perry shows Tim clutching a neon yellow smartphone, a motif which appears again in the final tapestry of the series, this time smashed on the ground as he lies dead after a car crash. Such familiar, modern devices are presented as symbols of wealth and class, invoking the strategies employed in paintings such as Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait (1434) or Thomas Gainsborough’s Mr & Mrs Andrews (1750). Perry, like Tim Rakewell, also transcended his humble origins to achieve international stardom. Saturated with dark humour, Expulsion from Number 8 Eden Close captures the moment at which the protagonist begins to fall headlong towards his untimely fate.

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