A PAINTING OF A RAJA GOMAN SINGH SUBDUING A RAMPAGAING ELEPHANT
A PAINTING OF A RAJA GOMAN SINGH SUBDUING A RAMPAGAING ELEPHANT
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Property from a Distinguished West Coast Collection
A PAINTING OF A RAJA GOMAN SINGH SUBDUING A RAMPAGING ELEPHANT

INDIA, RAJASTHAN, KOTAH, CIRCA 1750

Details
A PAINTING OF A RAJA GOMAN SINGH SUBDUING A RAMPAGING ELEPHANT
INDIA, RAJASTHAN, KOTAH, CIRCA 1750
image 8 x 12 ¼ in. (20.3 x 31.1 cm.)
folio 8 ½ x 12 ¼ in. (21.6 x 31.1 cm.)
Provenance
Private collection, California, acquired in the 1970s, by repute.
Property from a Private California Collection; Sotheby's New York, 21 March 2012, lot 206.

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Lot Essay

Raja Goman Singh (r. 1766-71) mounts an violently gyrating, escaped elephant, as his attendants attempt to subdue the large animal with spears. Elephant fighting was a popular sport amongst the Rajputs, Maharajas often keeping massive stables for their elephants and naming their favorites. The tradition of elephant keeping was most cherished in the states of Kotah and Bundi, whose artists dominated the genre of Elephant studies. Artists from Kotah and Bundi represented Elephants with great skill and great empathy, with remarkable line work and expressive momentum and drama. For another version of the same scene, of the same scene, see Rosa Maria Cimino, Life at Court in Rajasthan, Florence & New York, 1985, no. 89, p. 90.

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